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Welcome to this SE, Daniel. I think the problem with the argument is what you are trying to prove: how can I disprove that there exists an inherent privilege (an entitlement) to believe whatever you want? Even Patrick Stokes agrees that people are entitled to their opinions. He writes: If “Everyone’s entitled to their opinion” just means no-one has ...


3

Welcome, El Ectric Hobbes is not the easiest historical philosopher to interpret; and the area of your question is still much contested but I think I can provide pointers towards an account that will make some things clearer. Subjective theory of value Hobbes is widely regarded as a subjectivist about value on the basis of texts such as the following: ...


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Given our limited knowledge of the earliest Western and Eastern philosophy, we shall probably never know who originated or first analysed the concept of property. But in the Western tradition, a provisional first place may be held by Plato. Plato Plato is clear in Republic III.416d-417a, IV.543b , and V.464c-e, 466b-c that the Guardians are not permitted ...


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That depends on what the problem is with killing people. A Deontologist could argue that the zombies have no inherent duty of care, being entirely imaginary entities, and so declare Open Season without qualm. A Consequentialist could notice that killing philosophical zombies has no effect IRL, and grab a shotgun. A Virtue Ethicist could acknowledge the ...


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So is there anyway to justify the first stance using consequentialist ethics (again I'm assuming a deontological approach is a no starter) ? In the middle eastern countries you can get executed for being a member of that group and it's because the government is strongly tied to their religion, so for many tolererance may be a matter of eternal punishment as ...


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