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Welcome to this SE, Daniel. I think the problem with the argument is what you are trying to prove: how can I disprove that there exists an inherent privilege (an entitlement) to believe whatever you want? Even Patrick Stokes agrees that people are entitled to their opinions. He writes: If “Everyone’s entitled to their opinion” just means no-one has ...


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Morally bad but morally right Something can be morally bad but in a particular context the right or a permissible thing to do. Say X is breaking a promise. This is a bad thing to do; all else equal it should not be done. But breaking a promise may in a particular situation for action be the right thing to do as the lesser of two evils. The moral badness of ...


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So is there anyway to justify the first stance using consequentialist ethics (again I'm assuming a deontological approach is a no starter) ? In the middle eastern countries you can get executed for being a member of that group and it's because the government is strongly tied to their religion, so for many tolererance may be a matter of eternal punishment as ...


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From a straightforward moral position like Kant's, nothing can ever make an immoral act moral. But rules that state what is and what is not moral can only be so clear. So one must allow others a certain level of freedom to decide how close to cut it, and how often to make mistakes. From such a point of view, every individual instance of self-defense ...


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What about Burke's Social Contract For The Ages? As much as society is the balance of our momentary self-concerned needs with those of others, there is an extent to which we must balance our eras momentary or short-term needs with long-term concerns that reach beyond the lives of individuals and even nations - likely say climate change, or nuclear waste. ...


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