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How should we choose between different theories according to Rorty, based on Kuhn?

To your final question: Rorty was happy to emphasize Kuhn's influence without needing to follow Kuhn. Search "forward to people who want to out-Kuhn Kuhn" to find a passage from Neil Gross's book ...
Colin McLarty's user avatar
4 votes

How do you respond to this common critique of American Pragmatism?

There are two main replies I think are important to point out: In pragmatism, a truth is an assumption that has predictive value when acting upon it. We know from experience that acting upon that ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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4 votes

How should we choose between different theories according to Rorty, based on Kuhn?

Option (2) is Rorty's unequivocal choice, and he pre-empts objections by declaring that truth and progress are themselves cultural artifacts without any overarching significance. There are only ...
Conifold's user avatar
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2 votes

Where did Rorty claim no essential difference between Philosophy and Literary Criticism/Theory?

Rorty does not make the claim that there is no essential difference between Philosophy and Literary Criticism/Theory. Rorty acknowledges that some (most?) current philosophers believe that there are ...
Nick Gall's user avatar
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2 votes

How do you respond to this common critique of American Pragmatism?

I'm not sure labelling pragmatism as 'anti-epistemological' is the best approach here. Pragmatism is anti-idealist or anti-Platonic; or perhaps better put it's Bayesian, not normative. It certainly ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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2 votes

Is there a conflict between upholding rational justification and seeing societal norms as its ultimate source?

Rorty's response might be that you are presuming some universal notion of "truth" with autonomous "meaning" that extends across societies. And since meaning is established only ...
Conifold's user avatar
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1 vote

What is bourgeois liberalism (as associated with Rorty)?

The bourgeoise, of course, is the generic term for the merchant or commercial classes that rose to power when the "Bourgeoise Revolutions" in England, France, and America overturned the ...
Nelson Alexander's user avatar

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