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5 votes
Accepted

Argument over rules not being followed

Rule-following is a complex philosophical issue. Rules have many purposes, including: Preventing incidental harm by people not fully aware of potential consequences Acting as an external conscience ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 21.3k
5 votes

Mill's Proof and Nozick's Experience Machine

Excellent question. J.S. Mill regarded the Greatest Happiness Principle as the moral truth. The principle states that "actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they ...
Nanhee Byrnes PhD's user avatar
4 votes

What was Kant's view on lies by omission?

The early works Kant gives multiple explanations for why lying is wrong and these accounts differ. In Kant's earlier works, Kant gives several different arguments against lying. Arguably the first in ...
3 votes

When two wrongs do make a utilitarian right

From a utilitarian standpoint lying is not wrong in and of itself. It can be justified as morally acceptable if the greatest good for the greatest number of people produced by promulgating an ...
Reuben's user avatar
  • 51
1 vote

Argument over rules not being followed

Rules keep order. That's why there are laws to physics, otherwise there would only be entropy with no life at all. (Corollary: One can conclude, therefore, that life co-evolved with physics -- ...
Marxos's user avatar
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1 vote

Argument over rules not being followed

That heavily depends on the rules in question. Like some rules are meant to be broken. Like idk some warnings are meant to scare away inexperienced people and so being able to overcome what was warned ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 6,896
1 vote

The birth of regimes

Hitler's party never won a majority of the vote. They made a coalition deal that made Hitler chancellor, then staged the burning of the Reichstag, just after they removed all the paintings. And used ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 22.5k
1 vote

Mill's Proof and Nozick's Experience Machine

What is happiness or pleasure??? Depending on the answer, you question can be either meaningful or meaningless. Philosophers have offered at least four different answers. happiness = hedonistic ...
Nanhee Byrnes PhD's user avatar

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