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4 votes

What does Sartre mean by "freedom alone can account for a person in his totality"?

Sartre is of opinion, "Existence before essence". This forms the basis of his assertion that humans are necessarily fully responsible for their action -- hence free. He said, "We are left alone, ...
Adeel Ansari's user avatar
4 votes

The phenomenon of Négatité

Nothing(ness) definitionally is being not Being. It therefore not is, ontologically. It is just that "not", the refusal to be this or that concrete X. Sartre often characterizes for-itself and its ...
ttnphns's user avatar
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4 votes

Sartre on essence

According to Sartre, humans are the only beings that don't have an essence It is an imprecise, maybe wrong statement, Sartre never said that. For Sartre, humans are devoid of (contact with) Being, ...
ttnphns's user avatar
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Sartre on essence

To understand how Sartre could ever say something like this, we need to look at an important pair of German philosophers and one Dane (actually we could probably find many more important people in ...
virmaior's user avatar
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In which published work(s) did Sartre claim to have reinvented or reshaped his thinking?

Sartre published his first works when he was over 30 and lived through turbulent times 40 more years. Of course his view changed but he was neither 'protean' nor 'sustained many radical ...
sand1's user avatar
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3 votes

The Sartre Paradox

What Sartre has in mind is that every other being in nature has a developmental pattern intrinsic to it. It has an essential nature, or 'essence', and its nature fixes its future development. Acorns ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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3 votes
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Does existentialism presuppose the supernatural?

If empirical undecidability is indeed a disease then philosophy is afflicted by it in almost its entirety, materialism included. The basic tenet of materialism, that everything is matter, is as ...
Conifold's user avatar
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3 votes

Was the European Left confined in a false dichotomy between capitalism and communism?

The dichotomy of the question (Communism vs. Capitalism) and the dichotomy actually mentioned in the quote are very different. The quote says Camus saw oppression in the Soviet Union (and the Soviet ...
pabs's user avatar
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3 votes

What are the origins of "The Other" and "The Gaze" in critical theory?

My own research bridges somewhat on these topics, and I would suggest adding the following people to your considerations: Hegel - specifically the idea of mutual recognition. Within this, I think it'...
virmaior's user avatar
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3 votes

Just what is negation in Sartre's philosophy?

If I understand this correctly, Sartre considers negation (usually as internal negation) as one of the fundamental aspect of humanity, because it reflects the tension between being-in-itself and being-...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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3 votes
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What is the meaning of nothingness in Sartre's ⟪Being and Nothingness⟫?

In Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialist masterpiece, "Being and Nothingness" (1943), nothingness (néant or le néant in French) is a central concept that plays a crucial role in understanding ...
TN157's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it correct to describe genuine possibilities as 'pure nothing'?

Possibilities are pure nothings. Whitehead discusses the logic of possibilities or "eternal objects" (as he calls them) in Process and Reality and his many other works. Possibilities, in themselves, ...
Paradox Lost's user avatar
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In which published work(s) did Sartre claim to have reinvented or reshaped his thinking?

My query was based on something read years ago and, the vagaries of memory being what they are, I am likely guilty of having conflated something someone said about Sartre as opposed to remembering ...
DJohnson's user avatar
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2 votes

Who were the famous moral nihilists (philosophers) of 20th and 19th century?

'Nihilist' was generally applied as an insult, especially around morality - it was first used to insult the rationalism of Kant (who I think no one could call a nihilist now!). It got used somewhat ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
2 votes

Existentialism and morality

Existentialism (along with absurdism, phenomenology, and a few other schools) is a descendent of Nietzsche's worldview. It carries over Nietzsche's lionization of the individual, and his radical ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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1 vote

Jean-Paul Sartre freedom question

Here are some key terms regarding Jean-Paul Sartre's concept of freedom: existence precedes essence, being for itself (one's own self), being for others (others' existence), and being in itself (all ...
Rajan Phogat's user avatar
1 vote

Is "quality of life" an in-efficacious measure for a "meaningful life"?

"A meaningful life" is not the same as a "good life". A serial killer, tyrant, school shooter, etc. does not need to make the world a better place for his/her life to have meaning, nor does it need ...
Nosajimiki's user avatar
1 vote
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In which published work(s) did Sartre claim to have reinvented or reshaped his thinking?

Here is a link to a magazine interview which may give some insight into his views on a changed position. Full quote removed. [Approx 35th q&a] JPS, answer: "In some ways-- perhaps... Playboy ...
Gordon's user avatar
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1 vote

We may say that Sartre inverts Kant’s moral philosophy. What does Sartre share with Kant, and how does he overturn some of his thinking?

▻ THE CENTRALITY OF FREE AGENCY In his Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Kant turns his attention to the problem of evil and, in doing so, develops a more complex picture of the human ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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1 vote

From which work of Jean-Paul Sartre did he write “Freedom is what we do with what is done to us.”?

In Critique of Dialectical Reason, vol. 1, Sartre wrote (translation from the Russian translation into English is mine) For us a man is characterized first of all by his surpass of the situation -...
ttnphns's user avatar
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From which work of Jean-Paul Sartre did he write “Freedom is what we do with what is done to us.”?

Maybe a "free" translation from: L'existentialisme est un humanisme (1946): Et en voulant la liberté, nous découvrons qu'elle dépend entièrement de la liberté des autres, et que la liberté des ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
1 vote

On freedom in Sartre's existentialism

You did not understand Sartre correctly. When he says people will choose freedom (of actions) he means in that passage that they are better to appreciate/recognize the fact they are already free, ...
ttnphns's user avatar
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