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11 votes
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Naturalism and anti-realism in the philosophy of science

The problem you will encounter here is that the main overlap between these two areas is science. Science itself, to be blunt, doesn't really care about philosophy very much, and so it doesn't have a ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 2,148
4 votes

Kant's Critique of pure reason vs Aristotle's perfect spheres

Short answer is yes. Kant tried to cut off most of traditional metaphysics as speculative, ie. making assertions about something we cannot actually know anything about. Basically, the Kantian critical ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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4 votes

Kant's Critique of pure reason vs Aristotle's perfect spheres

Just to add a little color — Kant showed that a lot of what was previously philosophical “givens” was capable of being argued equally well either way (the famous antinomies about the size and age of ...
Joseph Weissman's user avatar
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4 votes
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How is scientific realism not an example of the fallacy of the converse?

Most of our normal thinking about the world is not purely deductive. When you wish to judge which is a better location for your papercraft business, or where you put your hat, or who is the current ...
causative's user avatar
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3 votes

Literature on Mathematical Universe Hypothesis beyond Tegmark?

I found your question when searching for the same answers. I am somewhat perplexed that the hypothesis of the mathematical universe, and Tegmark's book and papers, have not resulted in a flurry of ...
R. Gold's user avatar
  • 39
3 votes

What is the principle of underdetermination?

Welcome RojasJ Underdetermination The essential issue is stated by W. Newton-Smith : Can there be theories which are underdetermined by all actual and possible observations ? That is, can ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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3 votes
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Prominence of Scientific Realism and Anti-Realism

You can check the philpapers survey. The PhilPapers Survey was a survey of professional philosophers and others on their philosophical views, carried out in November 2009. The Survey was taken by ...
Lukas's user avatar
  • 3,155
3 votes

What is the relationship between Kripke's rigid designators and scientific realism?

It does make sense in a way. Kripke's thesis is that proper names have essences, properties that belong to them of necessity, not accidentally. Putnam extended this thesis to "natural kinds" of ...
Conifold's user avatar
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3 votes

Is the 'no miracles' argument for scientific realism viciously circular?

Someone like Quine would embrace that it's circular. Naturalized epistemologists tend to be coherentists, who tend to get charged with having circular (or criss-crossing-but-never-essentially-...
Lothrop Stoddard's user avatar
3 votes

Ontic structural realism: what's the difference between 'structures are all there is' and 'all there is are structures'?

Some cash-outs: "Structure is all there is": out of the many things that we say exist, things primarily identified in terms of being structures are the only things that "actually" ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
3 votes
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Ontic structural realism: what's the difference between 'structures are all there is' and 'all there is are structures'?

Okay, so if one examines the abstract, he spells out the position, however, one has to be familiar with some basic ontology to make sense of that abstract. Let's see if I can't do that for you. Ontic ...
J D's user avatar
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3 votes

How is scientific realism not an example of the fallacy of the converse?

The Stanford Encyclopedia entry on Scientific Realism states that Scientific Realism "recommends belief in both observable and unobservable aspects of the world described by the sciences." ...
Christian Hennig's user avatar
3 votes
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Is there an objective in science that only has one method to accomplish it?

If by "science" you mean engineering, then there are almost always many methods available to achieve the same (desired) result. In fact the objective of an engineering task is to identify ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
3 votes

Analytic/continental philosophy and scientific realism

Short answer No. Analytic philosophy tends to self identify that way, but this is a false claim. Science is pragmatic and empirical, while analyticity tries to understand the world thru rationality ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 14.6k
2 votes

What is the principle of underdetermination?

Boiling down the SEP entry, this is what I get. Underdetermination is the case where we just don't know enough to get to a conclusion. Consider the link between smoking and lung cancer. We have ...
David Thornley's user avatar
2 votes
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What is the 'idea' behind structural realism?

You might find the following helpful : Originating with Poincare (1905) and before, structural realism (hence forth SR) is a view of scientific theory change asserts that equations, that are ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
2 votes

Responses to the problem of Underdetermination

Here's a line of critical thought launched by Samir Okasha. It suggests that the underdetermination thesis derives some of its support from a false assumption that the concepts of empirical ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
2 votes

Advancements in scientific mind and its side effects on society

The answer is obvious. The scientific mind has been advancing in/with time, and as it has advanced, it has had tremendous "side effects" on society (both good and bad). All you have to do, is study ...
Guill's user avatar
  • 1,765
2 votes

How does mediation inherent in the senses not refute Searle's "direct realism"?

1) "all we can ever be aware of is the conscious experience" is a False Dichotomy. We can be aware of the real objects but only in a mediated fashion, "through a glass darkly" as it were. I don't see ...
transitionsynthesis's user avatar
2 votes
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What is the difference between instrumentalism and operationalism?

Instrumentalism is a pragmatic school of thought which asserts what is real (ontology) and what is true (epistemology) are ideas that aren't answerable and thus is an antirealist position. This is ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
2 votes

Is instrumentalism popular in contemporary philosophy of science?

If instrumentalism is very roughly the view that scientific theories are (only) instruments for making predictions, it is not an appproach widely favoured explicitly in the philosophy of science. But ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
2 votes

Why a theory is still used after proven wrong?

Consider proving that the relatively more narrative-orientated domain of chemistry, is completely reducible to the equations of physics. Do we consider chemistry to no longer be useful? No. It is a ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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2 votes

Why a theory is still used after proven wrong?

If you look at this from the perspective of someone following Popper (say Lakatos or Toulmin), the focus is no longer on theories being proved wrong or overturned. From a more subtle approach, ...
hide_in_plain_sight's user avatar
2 votes

Why does mathematics manage to represent a function of reality?

Here is my way of looking at "the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics". In the real world, counting macroscopic objects like pebbles or people is useful because in the real world, ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
2 votes

In our best scientific theories, is there a difference between "the universe" and "reality"?

This question jumbles a few things, which I think can be untangled. A) It is possible to do science as a nominalist, rather than as a realist. But every scientist I have ever interacted with, is very ...
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 14.6k
2 votes

Subatomic particles and Freud’s subconscious entities

Short Answer Assuming Freud is a short-hand for modern psychology of personality, then the difference between personality psychology and subatomic particles is best understood as the divide between ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
2 votes

What is the status of the no miracles argument?

Observe that the blue straight line is the sum of the red and green curves (parabolas). People not told this would assume that a particular scientific theory is a simple straight line, when in fact it ...
Hudjefa's user avatar
  • 3,929
2 votes
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Why so many scientifically sane people are so ignorant in question about human consciousness?

Why so many scientifically sane people are so ignorant in question about human consciousness? The cognitive sciences have an enormous amount of data on the brain and (a little less) on the mind, but ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 8,173
1 vote

In our best scientific theories, is there a difference between "the universe" and "reality"?

Specifically regarding scientific theories, what's "real" is typically what's "measurable", i.e., detectable by some reproducible experimental apparatus (or maybe just your five ...
eigengrau's user avatar
  • 585

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