10

It is not true. The Analects do contain "If names be not correct, language is not in accordance with the truth of things. If language be not in accordance with the truth of things, affairs cannot be carried on to success" (Legge translation) and more to that effect. He does not say words or symbols or anything like that "rule the world." I take it that ...


6

I suppose you are looking for reasons not to identify properties to sets. (1) A set is a particular ( an abstract particular) , but properies are often considered as universals . (2) A property is something an object possesses, shares; it is also the case for a set? I mean, could I say that an apple " possesses" the set of red objecs? (3) Suppose ...


6

I believe the quote is apocryphal. Some of the sentiment might be compatible with Confucianism but there are several problems for supposing Kongzi would have said this or that this would be found in a work people classically attributed to Confucius. (It is well known that the texts attributed to Confucius were not written by Confucius) There's not much talk ...


5

Peirce' Theory of Signs is complex and - unfortunately - there are no complete treatises dedicated to semiotics by Peirce himself : Across the course of his intellectual life, Peirce continually returned to and developed his ideas about signs and semiotic and there are three broadly delineable accounts: a concise Early Account from the 1860s; a complete and ...


3

I think that Barthes' sentence "boxing is a Jansenist sport" may be more conspicuously rendered like this: the common form of boxing (unlike the common form of wrestling) is a genuine sport. First, it is clear, within Barthes' The World of Wrestling, that by the word "wrestling" he did not mean the genuine sport, the Olympic (Greco- Roman) type of wrestling....


3

Daniel Chandler wrote a book Semiotics: the Basics and also supplies an online version here. For a large part of English speaking academia, after Chomsky's reformulation of linguistics into the field that it is today, semiotics became something of a minor topic. At the very least it is not studied in those circles the same way it was studied when Pierce and ...


3

Unfortunately, we do not have a satisfactory theory of meaning (semantics) of natural languages, i.e. of understanding words, or even of using them (pragmatics). Kripke's causal theory of reference for proper names comes closest to a consensus, but only if it is narrowly restricted to proper names, and even then it is not too close. The alternative theory, ...


3

I haven't read Kripke's Naming & Neccessity, however the linked article quotes Wittgenstein from his Philosophical Investigations: There is one thing of which one can say neither that it is a metre, and nor that it is not a metre - and that is the standard metre kept in Paris. But this of course is not to ascribe some extraordinary property to it, but ...


2

Although I'm a linguist, I'm going to not give a report on the sociology of the term as used in the field (though the quick answer is "yes"). Instead, I will focus on the basic conceptual distinctions. The term "language" refers to the numerous methods of encoding propositions and communicating, which humans use -- examples are Greek, English, Swahili, ...


2

Peirce invented the so-called "existential graphs". A good description of this is found in §4.7 "The geometry of thought: Existential graphs" (pp. 69-72) of Peirce: A Guide for the Perplexed by Cornelis de Waal. More in-depth studies are: Don D. Roberts, The Existential Graphs of Charles S. Peirce (The Hague: Mouton, 1973) J. Jay Zeman, “The Graphical ...


2

Looking at the philosophy expounded by Plato, one thing comes to mind: the Ideas, set in another realm, above the material, quite abstract. Thus, it could mean that the raised index finger points to this very realm of Ideas, where the highest principles of virtue lie and to which one must aspire. A similar explanation goes for Socrates, to which we can add ...


1

Semiotic theory of American philosopher and mathematician C.S. Peirce elaborates philosophy of index according to reference here: Peirce argued that logic is the formal study of signs in the broadest sense, not only signs that are artificial, linguistic, or symbolic, but also signs that are semblances or are indexical such as reactions. Peirce held that &...


1

Where semiotics is essentially the study of symbols and their manipulation for their own sake, memetics is a "neo-Darwinian" evolutionary theory of the ideas communicated via those symbols. Besides Dawkins, Daniel Dennett and psychologist Susan Blackmore have contributed most strongly to the theory of memetics. Whether it will end up as a branch of ...


1

It's not the Charles Key Ogden & Ivor Armstrong Richards diagram, that uses the terms Symbol, Thought or Reference and Referent and there is no indication of Semiosis. I think I may have located the source. It seems to be the article from which the original image link I posted came - at least the post on this weblog (http://bpdp.blogspot.co.uk/2012/...


1

Philosophers of language and logicians too often dismiss the contributions of linguistics to their field I'm not sure just how true this when looked at closely. for example Godel explicitly said that it was the Cretan Liars Paradox that inspired his incompleteness theorems; and Aristotle in the Organon explicitly uses the linguistic feature of possibility ...


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