3

In this scenario, consuming plants would be incompatible with the principle of trying to avoid unnecessary suffering given our current agricultural practices. If consuming plants caused suffering, such suffering wouldn't be unnecessary, at least not to staying alive and healthy for the consumer. We know that we can live long, healthy, happy lives as vegans. ...


3

Unlike many things, personhood is binary. Is it torture to grate a carrot that you pulled from your garden moments ago? Provided the science fictioney premise that things you make could attain personhood, like Pinnochio did through magic or Frankenstein's monster did through science, it could not be unethical to prevent that from happening because the pre-...


3

I think user3776022 has the right of it---in the conflict between physicalists and dualists there is no winner. But that's just because both physicalism and dualism provide faulty pictures of the world. I'd like to present hints at an alternative view. The founder of modern action theory is a philosopher named GEM Anscombe; I cannot recommend her book, ...


2

I have been recently reviewing the question of consciousness vs. awareness and it seems to me that consciousness includes an element of knowing something that is in awareness while awareness can be sub-conscious as demonstrated by selectively becoming conscious of specific stimuli as they arise which would not be possible without sensory awareness. Based on ...


2

If by 'God' you mean creator, the answer is 'yes' by construction. If by 'God' you mean has the right to get what he wants, you've entered the world of rights, for which I'd recommend Nicholas Wolterstorff's 2010 Justice: Rights and Wrongs. If by 'God' you mean moral example, you beg the question of what morality is, for which I'd recommend Alisdair ...


2

You are touching on two different problems in philosophy of mind, the hard problem of consciousness and the problem of freewill. Sentience is the capacity to feel, perceive, or experience subjectively, according to Wikipedia, and if (in this case) an NPC can be programmed to perceive and experience subjectively, is there a way for it to 'feel'? Obviously ...


2

This answer has several parts. First, you are misinterpreting Schrodinger. He is not denying that perception can come from matter, he explicitly leaves that open (nothing can be "discarded" yet, and no inference as to its ultimate source is yet valid either). Instead, he is just outlining the starting point for all our worldview IS our first-...


2

Sentience, capable of sensing. Consciousness, awareness of things. Often implied is self-consciousness or self awareness. Studies on coma patients show some of their brains can respond to sounds, and this helps indicate which are more likely to wake up - it suggests at least less damage. So there is a degree of sentience there, sensing, reactivity, but not ...


1

There are various versions of the Turing test, including modern extended versions about being able to make efficient abstractions. People miss Turing's real core point though, which is that we have to find a way to use evidence, rather than imagining there is a difference in essence (eg, a soul). That is the core of the Turing Test, and on that basis it will ...


1

When a neurophysiologist talks about the different senses, (s)he means the different neural systems which communicate information about one's environment to the brain, per Conifold's comments above. In your case of pollen allergies, the nerve endings in your nasal cavity pick up the chemical signal from the surface of the pollen grains and that triggers a ...


1

This is my first contribution to philosophy stackexchange - I hope I comply with community rules, please do let me know if I should edit my answer. You suggest at the end of your post that ecosystem stability could be an alternative focus. I would suggest that the debate has already partly shifted in this direction with a growing focus on the associated ...


1

One approach to this issue hinges on an ambiguity in the term "insentient." We would typically take this to mean "less than sentient" --a chair is insentient. However we might speculate that God would be "more than sentient" in ways it might be difficult for us to conceptualize or understand. If I understand you correctly, you're taking sentience as a ...


1

The answer to my question appears to be a case of philosophical naturalism vs. dualism (as some of the comments and answers have also alluded to). When presented with the question of whether sentient beings are originators or mediators of causal chains, we arrive at the question of where thoughts originate from, and this brings us to the ideas of duality ...


1

I like your idea about nutrition so I would like to extend it. Hunger causes you to act Whenever you’re hungry, many different biological changes happen to your body, which in turn has several effects on your brain. Rather than even consider the science behind this, it’s easily proven by the fact that the thought “I’m hungry” will pop into your brain. Once ...


1

I found the solution to this question, along with my adviser in philosophy of science, in Russell and Whitehead and the event ontology they came to share. They responded to the limiting velocity by reducing dual-parameter space-time to a causal web of time-ordered events, and they situated human sentient events among the other causally primitive events of ...


1

It may be good to first acknowledge that an event can have more than one cause. If I get up and walk around, one cause of that is nutrition; had I not eaten anything recently, I would not have had the strength to get up. (This is known as "but for" causation; but for the nutrition, I would have stayed seated.) Another cause is that I read a question that ...


1

your question: My question is whether the actions of conscious beings are considered to be caused by something as well and whether they are causes in and of themselves? (i.e, if a conscious being performs an action, is the being its own cause?) help us and provide us to find Cause and effect law then find Soul and finally find GOD. I refer you to first Isaac ...


1

See here re: Animal Minds and a counter-example to Hume's Guillotine then formulate desire-independent reason(s) for action based on an argument you can advance. Lastly, you'll want to use Rawl's Veil of Ignorance and apply it to those animal minds. I've heard that even plants have feelings... Perhaps focus on the stability of the ecosystem? The ...


1

Drawing on existing contributions, I wonder if introducing the concept of interoperability might lend clarity and a useful organizing stability to the discussion of these interrelated terms? To wit: Consider human development (both of an individual subject and of the specie in toto) and the utility of the underlying characteristics embodied by each of these ...


1

Dawkins shows every sign of being a (philosophical) realist and resisting attempts at philosophical complication of empirically robust results. (If pushed, I'm pretty sure he'll follow the data: "the best model is that reality is 'real'".) Therefore, he would, I imagine, say that we have oodles of evidence that our minds are all quite similar; whether or ...


1

You can only see all the colors that you can see. If you are color blind (like me) you cannot see all the colors that people who are not color blind can see; just as you cannot see the ultra violet light that some birds and insects can see, and there is nothing it is like for you to NOT see the ultra violet light that some birds and insects can see. Why do ...


1

This question has a different answer depending on whether you are talking about a monotheistic or a polytheistic conception of God. In monotheism, a central part of the conceptualization of God is that God is the "Prime Mover", the ultimate source and creator of all things. Even if there are intermediate creators, they do not take on the same status. Thus,...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible