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Whether social status is "real" would depend on the sense in which you think, say, rocks and stars are "real". There are important debates between realists and anti-realists in these questions, and there are people who occupy all four quadrants: both natural physical entities and social objects are unreal, both are real, natural objects are real and social ...


7

Freud has written one text, known as the "Unheimlich" (uncanny). This term refers to something that seems to be unfamiliar and familiar at the same time, and this would create discomfort, because the person cannot respond rationally to it, so the person would retreat and avoid it (possibly could try to eliminate it as well, e.g. killing it). Possibly the ...


6

Social status is very real. It is also subjective. These are not opposites. Thoughts and beliefs are real because they affect the real world. Status is a belief, an opinion. (Anybody who argues that the real world is not real can go play somewhere else) Status is always relative in the sense that person A only has status in the opinions of a different ...


4

I don't dispute your statement that people tend to ridicule the unfamiliar, but you have chosen two particularly poor examples--in fact, they serve to illustrate an alternate phenomenon, which is that people ridicule things that are known to be wrong or not make sense. In your Bigfoot example, we know that we have observed pretty much the entire surface of ...


4

According to Wikipedia Ivan Illich opposed "institutionalized education" or "compulsory mass education", but he favored "self-directed education, supported by intentional social relations, in fluid informal arrangements". It may be a misrepresentation of his position to simply say he was "so opposed to schools" unless one clarifies that what he was opposed ...


3

¿Does this debate have a name? It's a question of personal identity. Apparently your main character has a strong national identity, which overpowers their personal, family, religious, professional, human, etc. identities. They may feel strong nationalism or/and patriotism. If their national identity is more powerful than their personal identity, then ...


3

From a biology perspective, Dominance Hierarchy is a real, objective thing. Alpha male monkeys, their mates, and their children get the prime feeding and sleeping spots. Other monkeys defer to them to make group decisions. Lower status monkeys are picked on and harassed if they step out of line. It's possible for a monkey to improve their rank through ...


3

In a world like the one described by you, it's possible that the question is sort of "wrong". That technology obviously is world-changing, so probably copyright would change too. Even leaving aside the possibility of an open digital-food-machine, and the possibility of an open digital recipe, it wouldn't be that much of a problem if people got fired, because ...


2

I think we need to look at your premises more closely. I don't think that we can say, as a blanket statement, that the "default reaction" to an unfamiliar idea is usually ridicule; if this were the case, education would be a near-impossible process. Every single thing you have ever learned was originally an unfamiliar idea to you. So, we need to look more ...


2

Depends on your definition of "real". If you follow a more theoretical branch of philosophy, the point is indeed a matter of debate. You can't touch, feel, smell, see social status. However, if you follow the argument that what is real is what can affect other things, then social status for sure exists because it affects (e.g. your career). It is the same ...


1

There isn't much confusion about why a culprit (or the culprit's immediate family, or lawyer) would engage in victim blaming. Part of human nature is that we see the world from our own singular perspective, and within the context of our own perspective — the 'thick description' of our own lives, to borrow a phrase from Geertz — we understand the motivations ...


1

I would point to the way causality is really a form of narration and narrative grouping, and tools that give definite answers in simple systems (eg physics) do not do so in complex systems, where the assumptions used to make cognitive models are suspect. We basically have a cognitive bias to project ourselves into a locus or centre of a story, and try to use ...


1

In some circumstances, there is conflict. For example, when a state exists for the purposes and benefits only of its leaders. In such a situation one should attempt to navigate choices such as to avoid risk and maximize benefit to oneself. There is no alternative. An example might be a despotic and tyrannical leader who punishes any misstep with violent and ...


1

There may be a distinction you could draw between the use of the phrase 'social construction' that Berger and Luckmann (1966) popularized in the Social Construction of Reality, and more reflexive ideas about the constitution of social rules or 'methods' such as Garfinkel's (1967) ethnomethodology. Berger and Luckmann's understanding of how social knowledge ...


1

Maybe the person you are looking for is Auguste Comte? Among other things he distinguished 5 different intellectual functions & 5 fundamental sciences. Check http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/comte/ More information might be helpful.


1

When I think of hunger, I think of what Jesus Christ said: "You will always have the poor among you..." He did not say that we will always have the hungry among us. So poverty as a problem is unsolvable, but what people actually need to survive is solvable. These matters of technology are designed and worked for to fulfill a need for survival. I think that ...


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