6

It's not a fallacy, it's a paradox that must be addressed by pro-Christians, anti-Socialists/anti-Communists, etc that goes by the common name, "The Problem of Evil". Have the theists adequately addressed "The Problem of Evil"? That's for you to decide. But it's not a fallacy.


5

There's two features in Marxism (here I'm working from its Hegelian background primarily as I think these problems transfer) that conspire to enable the objection that it is anti-individual: First, following Hegel, the Marxist picture is such that the whole is the real. In the Hegelian picture, this whole is "spiritual" but in the marxist version it's ...


4

It's a common misconception to think the terms socialism and communism were not used as terms before Marx and Engels. They were. It's even more common to think they gave them clear unambiguous definitions, at least in their work. They didn't, but used a number of terms interchangeably. For people in the USA, the terms are defined by their use by the Soviets, ...


4

Neither 'liberalism' nor 'socialism' has a single, core, essentialist meaning. Liberalism without economics But if we take John Locke or John Stuart Mill as liberal political theorists, proponents of philosophical liberalism, then this liberalism has no necessary connexion with market capitalism (Darwinian or other), laissez-faire, or any other type of ...


4

The Jewish Question is a criticism of Bruno Bauer, who argues that the emancipation of Jews is subordinate to the emancipation of mankind: Bruno Bauer replies to them: No one in Germany is politically emancipated. We ourselves are not free. How are we to free you? You Jews are egoists if you demand a special emancipation for yourselves as Jews. As Germans, ...


3

Socialism is not intrinsically linked to a strong state, or indeed any state at all. An oxymoron is a contradiction in terms. Anarcho-monarchy would be a contradiction, as a monarchy is a form of government itself. Socialism is not a form of government - it is simply the advocation of certain economic ideas: equality of outcome, collective ownership, etc. ...


3

If you follow this link you'll discover that Albert Einstein had a tendency to get his freak on. But to date (so far as I know) Einstein's sexual escapades have not undercut the principles of modern physics. Well... I suppose they might sow some doubts about the Big Bang theory, but honestly... It's an obscure truism that philosophy is psychology writ large. ...


3

The Red Prussian by Leopold Schwarzschild, 1986 ed., is an even more savage assault on Marx’s personality. It depicts Marx’s ideas and arguments as intellectually worthless and as used by Marx as a mere means of dominating working-class movements in the interests of gaining personal power. Neither Johnson nor Schwarzschild has much insight into the nature of ...


3

There can be different responses to your question, depending on which definition from the Oxford dictionary you go with. Based on the first definition: "The practice or principle of giving a group priority over each individual in it". "Collectivism" isn't synonymous with "Communism" or "Socialism" nor is it antynomous with "Capitalism" - all of which ...


3

Marx's views were arguably anti-Semitic: What is the worldly religion of the Jew? Huckstering. What is his world god? Money. — Marx, „On the Jewish Question“, 1844; (ref. Francis Wheen — „Karl Marx: A Life“, 2001)


2

Marxism explains behaviour in terms of classes, not individuals. It also attributes the same interests to all members of a class. This makes no sense since being a worker or capitalist or whatever is a role. As a result, a person can play either role at different times, or both at the same time. Lots of people have a day job and some investments: they work ...


2

Your reading of Marx on alienation is correct. Critics of Marx and of socialism are mistaken if they argue that Marxism seeks to destroy individuality, or that socialism necessarily does so. If their criticism is based on something else, or if it is directed at a subset of what we may call "socialism", then it depends of whom they are accusing of what. The ...


2

I think it is fair to say that Marx looked at all religions as a method of pacification of the masses. As far as Judaism in particular, for the time and place, there was a predominant antisemitic sentiment. There seems to be some particularly poignant information regarding Karl Marx's father, Heinrich Marx. H. Marx having lived during the post Napoleonic ...


2

Modern but not necessarily still living (L): Noam Chomsky (L) Terry Eagleton (L) Bertell Ollman (L) Perry Anderson (L) Chantal Mouffe (L) John E. Roemer (L) Eric Hobsbawm (d. 2012) G.A. Cohen (d. 2009) Ralph Miliband (d. 1994) E.P. Thompson (d. 1993)


2

Good question. The simple answer is no. Marx did not make any clear theoretical distinction between socialism and communism. You are correct that he describes a "first phase" of transition to communism in Critique of the Gotha Program but does not use the term "socialism" as a name for that phase. For an overview of how Marx understood socialism/communism ...


1

Marxist theory deals with political-economies; democracy is a simple political decision-making system with no entailed economic connection. When Marxists think about democracy they think about the underlying socioeconomic structures which democratic systems are lain over and above, because they believe the socioeconomic structures are what drive the system ...


1

'Leaving' and 'better life' are the two terms that make this question rather subjective. You can leave your native country for study purpose or for other good purposes and then return and lead a better life as many people do. Often this can be treated as moral. But we can't admit intellectual and moral betrayal. It is always immoral. If your question is ...


1

Review the concept of morals, and review your economy concepts, because you're subjectively implying a lot. Morals is a system of regulation like religion or law, which ultimate goal is improving the survival probabilities of the group. Economy is not a zero-sum game, that is, living in a country is normally a win-win (except when you're clearly destructive ...


1

Hegel, in his Philosophy of Right views 'trade' as having a 'world-historical character'; and so it has proven - it's known as capitalism and more recently as globalisation where it achieves it's 'world-historical character'; and I suppose this may be why some people call this phase late capitalism. He also points out England as the locus of this world-...


1

The question you are asking about "goodness" of the Creator versus the existence of evil has traditionally been put in perspective with a key feature of the Creation: that it contains living beings endowed with freedom. To reduce that argumentation to its essence, freedom of choice, which allows an individual to select any behavior, is taking precedence over ...


1

Your question is fallacious. It is a straw-man question, in which you focus on one version of the way the Problem of Evil is posed. This particular phrasing, in which Good and Evil are treated as real Platonic Forms, assumes an ontology that many people do not agree with. While the majority accept objective morality, and objective morality is most ...


1

The argument is called the 'Epicurian' argument and goes like this : If god is all powerful then he can prevent child Leukemia and ebola. If he doesn't then he is not kind, and is undeserving of our worship. Take your pick. Is god not god (not all powerful) or is he an asshat sadist? It's not a test.. its not a fallacy.. it's a logical argument. Hand ...


1

"Revolutionary" is ambiguous here, depending on the context; it could mean either backward-looking (the bourgeois/capitalist revolution overthrowing feudalism) or forward-looking (the socialist revolution overthrowing capitalism) or both. To make things a little more concrete, consider Adam Smith's discussion of a pin factory. In a pre-industrial economy,...


1

The Soviet Union,and other socialist societies such as the current North Korean regime and National Socialist Germany, legitimised their crimes by referring to collectives like the proletariat or the Volk or the party. Such societies also did not give much latitude to individuals to own and run businesses, societies, clubs etc. Rather such organisations were ...


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