New answers tagged

0

You should really remove "Covid vaccination" from this, because there are plenty of people who strongly believe that covid vaccination will hurt you, and if that's what you believe, then convincing someone to get vaccinated seems clearly unethical. Ask instead "is it ethical to convince someone to do something that is objectively beneficial ...


1

If a person... Has identified a particular goal (Eg: the maximisation of a community's wellbeing) as ethical, and Has identified an action they sincerely believe will contribute towards the achieving of that goal (Eg: convincing people to get vaccinated/refuse vaccination), ...then performing that action is ethical, regardless of whether or not they are ...


3

Ethics won't give you the answer on its own, because ethics judge our deeds on the basis on their consequences on us and other people. And judging those consequences depends on other sciences. Is it morally acceptable to refuse vaccination because of personal beliefs, or force vaccination on others despite their personal beliefs? It all depends, what does it ...


24

When something has a label on it, it will influence how we think about it, even if the thing isn't what the label says. So I think it's important to define the terms in depth. Suppose a pharmaceutical product labeled "vaccine" possesses the following characteristics (and ignoring cost): Probability of seriously harming the recipient, for example ...


34

You approach the problem from the position that everyone knows & agrees on the safety & efficacy of the vaccine. But people don't refuse it because they wish to declare that they are selfish & uninterested in wider community wellbeing. Common reasons people give for refusing the covid vaccine, are that this RNA style is a new type of vaccine that ...


3

Two points... First, there is nothing immoral about trying to convince someone of some point. Political society in Liberal democratic nations depends of the ability of different people within the population to communicate and convince each other. Even in non-liberal societies, convincing others to agree is a central principle, though non-liberal systems ...


6

John Rawls discusses this subject, albeit briefly, in A Theory of Justice. The context is the issue of public goods, for example in light of the free-rider problem. The section is #42 (pg. 237 of the 1999 edition). Another aspect of the public goods situation is that of externality. When goods are public and indivisible, their production will cause benefits ...


Top 50 recent answers are included