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32 votes

If Socrates said he was ignorant but was in fact knowledgeable, was he simply a liar?

Not to dispute Dr. Palmer's account, but Socrates' main argument at his trial was that he was not trying to impose knowledge on the citizens of Athens. Instead — to use Socrates' analogy — he was like ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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23 votes

If Socrates said he was ignorant but was in fact knowledgeable, was he simply a liar?

Socrates might not have ever claimed this. See here. An example of what he did say is: I am wiser than this man, for neither of us appears to know anything great and good; but he fancies he knows ...
causative's user avatar
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14 votes
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Who is Plato and Socrates' God?

Whether Plato's character of Socrates or Plato himself believed in a God or many Gods is not perfectly clear. Additionally, we can't ascribe any sort of belief to the historical Socrates; we just don'...
Not_Here's user avatar
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11 votes
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Does Nietzsche's rejection of Socrates mean that he is a relativist about ethics?

I believe the Nietzsche's passage referred to is this one: "Socrates' decadence is suggested not only by the admitted wantonness and anarchy of his instincts, but also by the hypertrophy of the ...
Conifold's user avatar
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9 votes
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Buddhism in Phaedo

SOCRATES VERSUS BUDDHA ON THE SOUL If Buddhism denies the existence of any continuing self or soul, this appears to conflict with Socrates' view of a continuing soul which is freed and released from ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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9 votes
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What is the origin of the idea that moral realism requires a god?

Your understanding of Euthyphro sounds inverted. At the time, the idea that "good" was just a name for what the gods approve of was a commonplace. Plato's goal here, in fact, is to replace ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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9 votes

If Socrates said he was ignorant but was in fact knowledgeable, was he simply a liar?

You stumbled over the Socratic paradox. It is a classical example of the Dunning–Kruger effect: You need a certain minimal competence to begin to perceive your own degree of incompetence. Because ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
8 votes
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"The beginning of wisdom is the definition of terms." - Socrates?

There's at least two reasons to suggest that Socrates never said this (though one of the reasons makes it so that it's unlikely one could definitively say this). Reason #1: Socrates did not write ...
virmaior's user avatar
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7 votes
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Does Socrates fear Euthyphro?

You said "With these two comments in mind, could we infer that Socrates fears Euthyphro?" By just taking two comments from such a large conversation, you are going to conclude somethings which may be ...
Giannos Antoniou's user avatar
6 votes

From dialogue to monologue : Why (Platonic) Socrates claims to know nothing but manages to give book-length speeches all the time?

The Platonic Socrates did not claim that he knew nothing. When asked by Chaerephon whether there were any wiser than Socrates, the Delphic Oracle replied that there was no one wiser (Apology, 21A). ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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6 votes

"Corresponding behaviour" in text on Socrates' philosophy

I'm put in mind of Socrates' speech in the Symposium, 201d- 212c, expressed as the report of a discourse of Diotima, the wise woman from Mantinea. I summarise from W.R.M. Lamb, Symposium, Loeb: ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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6 votes

What Socrates meant when he pointed his finger up?

Not on David's Death of Socrates (the painting referred to in the question), but on Rafael's fresco the School of Athens (Scuola di Atene), an interpretation of Plato's and Aristotle's right hand ...
Tankut Beygu's user avatar
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6 votes

Is the temperance resulting from the socratic maxim "know thyself" always about knowing others?

As I see it, it's crucial to acknowledge the source of the maxim - from inscriptions on the Temple of Apollo at Delphi where this was 1st of 3 above the entrance, so held in the highest honour of all. ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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5 votes
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Are people inherently good according to Plato?

Are people inherently good according to Plato? This may be a delicate question. On the one hand, Plato's Socrates asserts, in the Phaedo, concerning the misanthropist (hater of people), that only few ...
Ram Tobolski's user avatar
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5 votes

When the Oracle called Socrates the wisest of the Greeks he at first rejected the label then accepted it. What caused Socrates to change his mind?

There's a lot of interesting features to the question. First, you need to consider how serious Socrates is being vs. how much of a joke he's making of the whole thing. Second, it's important to ...
virmaior's user avatar
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5 votes
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Did Socrates believe all madness to be good?

No. See Plato's Phaedrus: Madness comes in two general forms: the diseased state of mental dysfunction, and a divergence from ordinary rationality that a god sometimes brings (see 265a–b). Divine ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
5 votes
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What were Socrates views on afterlife?

According to reference of Phaedo's recording of Socrates here: Socrates concludes that the soul of the virtuous man is immortal, and the course of its passing into the underworld is determined by the ...
Double Knot's user avatar
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5 votes

If Socrates said he was ignorant but was in fact knowledgeable, was he simply a liar?

This is similar to Descartes' "experiment" where he proposes to doubt everything. In the beginning of Pensées, he realizes that there is one thing he cannot doubt: his own existence. Hence &...
axlotl's user avatar
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5 votes

What Socrates meant when he pointed his finger up?

In Plato's Phaedo which describes Socrates' last hours after he is sentenced to die by drinking a poison called hemlock (the cup in the painting), Socrates argues for the immortality of the soul and ...
Hypnosifl's user avatar
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5 votes
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Did Socrates' actual apology resemble Plato's Apology?

We don't know how far Plato's account is accurate, but most people assume it is broadly correct. In favour of that, there were other people around who would have objected to his account if it was too ...
Ludwig V's user avatar
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4 votes

Please expose how Socrates subtly Appeals to Pity

It is not a logical argument or "syllogism" whatever; it is a piece of rethoric, that runs as follows: i) if some one, on a similar occasion, prayed and entreated the judges with many tears, and ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
4 votes

Possible Logical Error in Euthyphro?

I symbolize what happens in the passage roughly as follows (I've bracketed the subargument from 3-5): Piety = Dear to gods "what is dear to the gods is holy and what is not dear to them is unholy" (...
virmaior's user avatar
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4 votes

Why is Nietzsche so against Socrates?

Most philosophers - esp those who focus on Nietzsche do not believe that he disliked Socrates - see Kaufmann among many others [including me]. Kaufmann, Walter A. "Nietzsche's Admiration for Socrates....
James Joyce's user avatar
4 votes
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What is the difference between dialectic and logic?

The link between the two is strong. The "dialectical method" (ἡ διαλεκτικὴ μέθοδος)was used by Plato in his dialogues as the central tool for philosophical inquiry; see Rep, 533c and see e.g. : ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
4 votes

Socrates and The Republic

Plato, Republic, 331c. The context is the initial discussion of Cephalus' conventional wisdom (see the refernces to Sophocles and Pindar). Cephalus suggest a naive view of justice, defined as "...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
4 votes

"The beginning of wisdom is the definition of terms." - Socrates?

The things Socrates thinks we need clear knowledge about are not terms but ideas. Terms are simply the utterances or lexicographical symbols we use to communicate ideas. The whole idea of the quote ...
Raven Cole's user avatar
4 votes

Does Socrates fear Euthyphro?

Notice what kind of fear is referred to, in the passage that you quoted. Soc. But where reverence is, there is fear; for he who has a feeling of reverence and shame about the commission of any ...
Ram Tobolski's user avatar
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4 votes

In Plato's Symposium, what are the similarities and differences between Phaedrus's speech and Socrates's/Diotima's?

You can see the Introduction to Plato's Symposium (Sheffield & Howatson editors), Cambridge UP (2008), for an overview of the various speeches of the dialogue. "Phaedrus, the first speaker, puts ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
4 votes
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The Orphic Socrates

Too little is known about the philosophical and religious beliefs of the historical Socrates, which are known to us mainly through the writings of Xenophon and Plato, to assign Orphic origins to any ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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