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Yes, Plato and Aristotle had very different views regarding the role of Government. Plato-(and probably Socrates), were no fans of Democracy. For Plato, Democracy, was an inferior political system that ultimately, led to the unethical trial, conviction and execution of his Mentor Socrates. And despite his lionization by today's Western public, Plato's ...


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It has been said that Plato is the most influential of all Western philosophers. No one agrees with him, but everyone starts their philosophical journey by disagreeing with him. Plato was essentially a mystic. He frames his ideas in practical language, but that's just for rhetorical purposes --the practical concepts are just to provide a way of apprehending ...


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In the case of Socrates, he certainly had enough of an influence within Athenian society, whereby the city's Political and Judicial Establishment had him arrested, tried, convicted and executed for "corrupting the youth" and apostasy. He was a very controversial figure in Athenian society and seems to have had only a single close friend.....Plato. ...


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Socrates existed in a ring of the universe that was YHVH, hence it was homo. Greece did not meaningfully exist in our world. There are no interactions with such an advanced culture, for example, in any literature. It comes to us from the interaction of the Church (Vatican) which was set up after the death of Jesus.


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From the final passages of The Republic, Plato has Socrates tell the myth of Er: All the souls had now chosen their lives, and they went in the order of their choice to Lachesis, who sent with them the genius whom they had severally chosen, to be the guardian of their lives and the fulfiller of the choice: this genius led the souls first to Clotho, and drew ...


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According to reference of Phaedo's recording of Socrates here: Socrates concludes that the soul of the virtuous man is immortal, and the course of its passing into the underworld is determined by the way he lived his life. The philosopher, and indeed any man similarly virtuous, in neither fearing death, nor cherishing corporeal life as something idyllic, ...


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If i am not short-read, of socrates' own views on the subject we almost know nothing, but if you want a discussion of this topic using socrates as a character, then a good source is the Phaedo; a dialogue that proposes that philosophers are learning to die, for they strive the separation of body and soul in order to fully focus on the undying realities that ...


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A first approximation... Plato, Apology, 29b: But I do know that it is evil and disgraceful to do wrong and to disobey him who is better than I, whether he be god or man.


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