10 votes

How does Berkeley justify existence of other minds?

This issue is addressed in Berkeley's Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, especially 145 and 148, and there is some disagreement as to what the nature of his argument is. Some take ...
  • 41.2k
9 votes
Accepted

Does idealism allow for thought without any sensory input?

Idealism does not necessarily assert mind as a fundamental entity, but it does assert the metaphysical priority of the ideal over the material. The view of reality as derivative from the mind is ...
  • 41.2k
9 votes
Accepted

Is it reasonable to believe that others have sentient minds?

It is more complex and convoluted to explain why other human beings would present such an utterly convincing simulation of consciousness and sentience than to simply assume that they are conscious and ...
7 votes

Is it reasonable to believe that others have sentient minds?

Asserting that "I have conscousness but no one else does" has a degree of implausibility similar to that of geocentrism: why, out of all of the (more or less) externally similar human beings does ...
  • 5,118
7 votes
Accepted

How do I prove that all people are illusion and only I am real in this world?

The simple answer is: a) You can't and b) It doesn't matter if we are. I think, therefore I am. Note that this statement doesn't include you, or him over there, it's a statement about me. Beyond that ...
7 votes

Refuting Solipsism

There are philosophers suggesting exactly that. To quote the promotion text of the recent book What Do Philosophers Do?: Skepticism and the Practice of Philosophy by Penelope Maddy (Oxford, New York: ...
  • 11.5k
6 votes
Accepted

An Argument against Descartes's radical doubt

The simplest and most powerful argument according to my opinion is the following: There is no reason for the universe to give the impression of something while something completely different (and not ...
  • 992
4 votes
Accepted

Do esoteric mathematical equations refute hard solipsism?

See Jabberwocky; it is a "well written" nonsense poem, full of suggestive rhymes and words, like : All mimsy were the borogoves. It is readable and enjoyable, and it has beeen translated multiple ...
4 votes
Accepted

What is Wittgenstein's "criterial solution" to the problem of other minds?

"Criterial" approach stems from Wittgenstein's view of meaning as use, and irreducibility of language to propositional knowledge and logic. Roughly speaking, according to Wittgenstein there are types ...
  • 41.2k
4 votes

What are the best Arguments against solipsism?

Argument 1: You don't (entirely) believe in Solipsism anyway You asked for help. Therefore, you believe there's someone besides you to answer. (Or at least, you consider the possibility that someone ...
  • 359
3 votes

Why isn't extreme solipsism the valid interpretation of quantum mechanics?

Extreme solipsism isn't a valid interpretation because you can do experiments where you're not the one observing. Observers don't have to be conscious; they just have to be entangled with the ...
  • 15.7k
3 votes

Are consistent solipsists limited to the singular when referencing themselves?

If you are a solipsist, from your point of view you would only be talking to yourself anyway. So you could say whatever you wanted. If you are a (presumably external) interlocutor trying to catch a ...
3 votes

Are consistent solipsists limited to the singular when referencing themselves?

If solipsism is the thesis that only I exist, then Berkeley was certainly not a solipsist since a major burden of his argument in the Principles is that all that exist are his and other minds or ...
  • 34.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Has any philosopher ever gone a step beyond solipsism and argued that nothing exists?

Gorgias argued that nothing existed in a now lost work called "On Nature". There are two surviving paraphrasis of it, however. The one by Sextus Empiricus can be found here, if you're interested.
  • 337
3 votes

How can there be multiple "points of view" in the world?

While this falls short of resolving the paradox, the following references may be helpful. JJ Valberg in his Dream, Death, and the Self explores similar paradoxes -- what he calls "extraphilosophical ...
  • 2,387
3 votes

Can the Universe make sense at all?

"A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do. He may as well concern ...
  • 11.6k
3 votes

What if I get born again as the same person for ever?

The problem with such a scenario is this: It is entirely unclear what it means to say that someone "lives their life over again".
2 votes

Computational counter-argument for solipsism

There are weak and strong forms of Solipsism. Historically Solipsistic arguments have fallen along a spectrum between the two forms along a spectrum. The most common form is the weak form, the ...
  • 189
2 votes

Are there any philosophical arguments to disprove or weaken solipsism?

Not a rebuttal, because solipsism is unfalsifiable anyway, but in On Certainty, Wittgenstein shows that in order to survive solipcists have to act hypocritically. Although they will profess they have ...
  • 3,382
2 votes

Is it reasonable to believe that others have sentient minds?

Analogy is one of Bertrand Russell's five postulates that validate scientific method. It states that "the behavior of other people is in many ways analogous to our own, and we suppose that it must ...
  • 2,142
2 votes

Do esoteric mathematical equations refute hard solipsism?

I like Mauro's analogy, and Mozibur makes a good point about the nature of realism. I'm not sure this is entirely what you have in mind, but it may be of interest nonetheless. You ask : "How, ...
  • 3,322
2 votes
Accepted

Are consistent solipsists limited to the singular when referencing themselves?

Solipsism can be more subtle than that, Berkeley's for example, although there is a linguistic disagreement on whether to classify his philosophy as solipsism, and Berkeley denied the label. Basically ...
  • 41.2k
2 votes

Does the Denial of the External World Lead to Solipsism?

The answer is sensitive to what is meant by "external" and "denial". For instance, one could say that the expression "external world" is incomprehensible (since we can ...
  • 41.2k
2 votes

Has any philosopher ever gone a step beyond solipsism and argued that nothing exists?

The status of "nothing is" is very sensitive what the context of "is" is. The radical skeptics like Pyrrho would withhold assent to even the most trivial everyday things, it is always "it seems so" ...
  • 41.2k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible