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5

This is indeed a long and well-established topic in metaphysics, going back, in fact, to the dawn of Western philosophy. We typically know it as "Plato's Cave." Arguably, of course, Plato meant it more metaphorically, and less literally than your version, but it's absolutely the same concept. In Plato's Cave, the world we experience is a projection of a ...


4

Mature Husserl is usually seen as a mild anti-realist, but this is largely due to the maxim that phenomenology should be neutral (agnostic) on metaphysical matters because it is the data it produces that is to be used to adjudicate them later. This means that Husserl's observations are typically easy to adapt to a realist perspective, after all even a ...


4

There's a lot going on in the body of your question, but I'm only going to address the Kant part. Kant's position is subtly different than what you are claiming. For a thorough discussion, see the SEP article on Kant's view on time and space. I'm primarily just going to work from that and try to simplify it with reference to precisely what you are claiming ...


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Short version I would argue that Durkheim seemed to think that the a priori character of space as a unitary frame across all rational beings was a threat to the socially determined plurality of representations of space his empirical approach showed and tried to capture. This, I would argue further, is a misinterpretation since it confused socially determined ...


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Question: My question is whether or not science has a physical or mathematical model that proves the roundness of the earth beyond what our senses tell us. Answer: Yes, one can determine whether the surface he/she is being on (including the surface of the earth) is flat or curved just by measuring some parameters of the surface, and he/she can do this on ...


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I'm not quite sure I understand the latter part of the question, but it sounds like you are a student who's looking for an ontological direction through which to view architecture and it's inherent subject/object dichotomy. Immediately I think of architects such as Steven Holl (Questions of Perception) or Louis Kahn or Peter Zumthor; all their material is ...


3

What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: 'This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more' ... That, combined with a closed universe collapsing--how does it measure up? It doesn't. They are two unrelated ideas. One is more about ...


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I feel that the philosophical consequences of the discovery of non-Euclidean geometry and later its use in Relativity are overstated. Our imagination is limited to flat space of dimension three. We cannot visualize anything unless embedded in 3-dimensional flat space. Euclid's axioms are a formalization of our intuition of space. This is the result of Greek ...


3

If you were to plug in different modules for space and time in the Transcendental Aesthetic, or if you were to fiddle around with his categories, what would this to to his project of wanting at least something to be "fixed" in place? True for all, if you will. Remember, the world of phenomena is already contingent, so can't something stay put and be true, ...


3

Let's start by defining our space as (3D + 1T). As each of its components grows, our universe "grows." However, at any instant of time, our universe is finite. But, even though it is finite, we can not detect or reach its "border" because we can't see or move in the "fourth dimensional' direction. The best analogy I can give you is: a very thin, transparent ...


3

Perhaps this is out of place, but there seems to be an aspect of it that is sometimes neglected in the discussions about time and space. I was thinking about the role of our brains in creating our experience with space and time. Our brains are perhaps not all processing the information (conceivably coming from some sort of unseen common environment) at the ...


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Everything we think we know about the universe could be wrong. But what the hell, lets start with what we think we know. We currently believe space is a dielectric substance which is why electromagnetic waves (including photons) pass through it. We suppose space is compressible (higher density near mass and less dense away from mass) per deflection of light ...


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I think your conclusion that space can't be finite is wrong. There can be finite space without a border or a "limit". Think of the Earth's surface. It's clearly finite but it has no border and wherever you go it doesn't involve walking towards a "limit". The same construct is possible with three dimensions (even though harder to picture, see Poincare ...


2

OK. Our universe is a 3-sphere expanding at the speed of light. A 3-sphere is the surface of a four dimensional ball or globe, the 4-dimensional ball consisting of spacetime. A 3-sphere is a 3-dimensional object. The earth is a 3-dimensional ball and its surface, ignoring fine detail, is a 2-sphere. It has no boundary and every point on it is the same ...


2

Consider that existence has always existed. To speak of nothingness cannot be to speak of something metaphysically salient or ontologically robust, but rather to speak of some queer (non-)existence conditions, or to in effect reify zero. I think we can successfully refer (through Meinongian semantic ontology) to non-existents, even non-existence, both ...


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Since an infinite number of lines passes through any given point, it follows that a point not only can divide two lines, but that it effectively divides any given number of lines.


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A few quick recommendations. Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space is wonderful, a moving and thoughtful approach to human dwelling; I might qualify it as part phenomenology and part philosophical anthropology. I really enjoyed The Continuous City (Lars Lerup) and Aureli’s The Possibility of an Absolute Architecture. In general you may also want to look at ...


2

You could look into the "psychogeography" of the Situationists, which is focused on the city. They may be a good starting point, even if more of a political and aesthetic avant garde, they have been influential in continental phliosophy. Have fun. I believe post modernism was coined in the 1930s by historian Toynbee, before migrating to literature in the ...


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Science can prove this very easily. You can prove it yourself in a very nice and convenient way if you're willing to spend say £30,000 for two people for a world cruise, going from Southampton, going west all the time, and arriving back in Southampton three months later. If you have a decent watch, it will tell you how the position of the sun changes all the ...


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The problem will all paradoxes of this particular sort is actually a problem of language: we don't have a good way (in spoken language or specialized languages like mathematics) to conceptualize tensors. The paradoxes work by slicing movement into a series of discrete, static positions separated by instantaneous movements between those positions, as though ...


1

According to Wikipedia a flat universe would have this property: Zero curvature (flat); a drawn triangle's angles add up to 180° and the Pythagorean theorem holds... This is not the case for the round Earth which has positive curvature on its surface: Positive curvature; a drawn triangle's angles add up to more than 180°... The spherical objects in ...


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Your question doesn't says one reality is the subset of the other. So, I wouldn't agree with your opinion. But if you had changed the question a little, (Eg. Could the reality we believe be a projection of the ultimate reality?) I would certainly say, "Yes". When you try to connect time with reality there must be some change in reality. And the change ...


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Stuart Hammeroff thinks consciousness, or mental structure, is not just a network of neurons but microtubules on the surfaces of neurons which in turn are connected by entangled quantum states - and these quantum states could exist independently of the brain (after the brain has whipped them into shape). Here is an excerpt from a 2011 interview. I’ve ...


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I think there should be more aesthetic philosophies. The lack of them, and of attention to aesthetics in philosophy generally, leads to an over-reliance of a shallow understanding of https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi in particular, in my experience. England had https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arts_and_Crafts_movement which we could do with more ...


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Let me interpret this scenario in its extreme form: we have two individuals who are, from a third-person perspective, very similar to each other, including in cognitive abilities. In particular, they tend to have equally many, and similar, thoughts in one second. As a result, there is no way that, as third-party observers, we will be able to figure out ...


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