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7

I don't think there's any one answer that all will accept on this question, but to simplify the sorting process for you, the real question you are asking is: "What is a state?" and then within this specifically the question of how such a state relates to its members. In terms of philosophical theories of the state (in this case the polis), the earliest two ...


4

I can see a couple ways to add definition to why and why not, and what it would mean. There is some dispute about reproductive division of labour, but there is a strong case to be made that humans are eusocial - they share some of the qualities of hive organisms. I feel the near universal existence of traditions of religious celibacy is the strongest ...


2

The question of abortion is probably one of the most morally ambiguous ones in our society, and it's not really answerable from a moral standpoint as the validity of believing that life begins and conception is just as valid as saying it doesn't - There will and can never be a logical consensus that states when life begins. This is the reason why we can't ...


2

There is no should here, without anyone here imposing their ethics over what you ask. Despite most of us expecting and wanting our laws be based on science or another intersubjective (take this one as the first keyword before asking, again, anything regarding society) behaviour or tradition, that does not occur. Quite frequently, the king, ruler, dictator ...


2

Being awake isn't fundamental. Rather, we find that sometimes we have persistent memory and perceptions apparently driven by external factors also observed by others; and other times we have transient memories and flighty perceptions not shared with others; and other times it seems most parsimonious to say that there was a period during which we were ...


2

My copy of the Concept of Anxiety is 7000 miles away, but I can answer more generall on this point. The basic idea is not original to Kierkegaard nor is his use of it singular to that particular text. Kierkegaard was especially fond of Diogenes the Cynic's response to one of Zeno's paradoxes.See here for more on the original case. For Kierkegaard, the ...


1

States have obligations to protect or even promote the interests of its citizens; and special cases aside, the primary responsibility for protecting or promoting citizens interests accrues to the state to which those citizens belong. But there are cases where a citizenry's interests can only be secured if the state does not accord priority to its own ...


1

There is no agreed definition of the State, so it is conceivable that one could absurdly define a large Family as having a territorial boundary, between the hedges and the driveway, say, and institutions of government, such as shared dishwashing. Here, Papa bellows, "L'Etat, c'est moi!" And the siblings retort, "Fraternité...liberté, égalité!&...


1

I do not perceive that the evidential, etiological, and theoretical bases for diagnoses of gender dysphoria have risen above adolescent insecurity and "growing pains" such that these treatments are reliably improvements over the alternative. The ethical basis of "not doing harm" seems to me to lean away from treating minors in this way, either by government ...


1

It's not a new idea. Haileybury School in England was set up by the East India Company to train civil servants to administer India. By its standards it was very successful, the school still exists but obviously not for this purpose. Note, though, that it's not at all clear that the people administered by the alumni of Haileybury necessarily agreed that they ...


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