9

These are standard abbreviations in classical scholarship. N.Q. is Seneca's Naturales quaestiones, Ep./Epp. are the very Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium you are reading (respectively, singular/plural), Vergil, Georg. is Vergil's Georgics, Cicero, De Nat. Deor. is Cicero's De Natura Deorum, etc. You can typically find the full title by googling the abbreviation,...


7

It's arguably not possible to "fully" understand any great work of philosophy. In the Platonic tradition, in fact, the general assumption is that you are being pointed in the direction of things that can never be fully explained, communicated or apprehended. With that said, Plato is extremely readable if you get a good translation, and is an excellent ...


7

Did Heraclitus believe in the identity of opposites? I do not think so. He is popularly quoted as having said, No man ever steps in the same river twice. But what he actually said is quite different, We both step and do not step in the same rivers. We are and are not. This points to a very different point of view; it is not the case that opposites ...


6

The natural rebuttal to Russell here is that he has misunderstood the Stoic understanding of Happiness. In choosing their actions and goods in a principle of "Rational decision in accordance with nature", Stoics do not deny what would make them happy. Happiness for the Stoics just is making that choice willfully. Perhaps Russell might be right were he to ...


6

It depends on your challenges. For instance, if you find it really tough to put up with other people, then your set of useful aphorisms would differ than if you were really attached to the opinions of others. Have you read Aurelius' Meditations or Epictetus' Enchridion? Both are very aphoristic-friendly, so you can extract passages that "speak to you" as ...


6

TL;DR The Stoic way includes empathetic reactions, i.e. groaning/moaning outwardly, in moments of shock. Both because it is a natural reaction even the perfect sage cannot help against and because he should help others to overcome their feelings. Long answer A.A. Long has something to say on this in his book Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life (...


5

Pythagoras the basis of philosophy? No way. For one thing, nothing he wrote has survived, and the stories his followers told are clouded by myths and legends. In terms of actual ideas, Pythagoras may have done some interesting things in math, but Euclid (of Alexandria) did considerably more. Many people agree with Whitehead that everything in European ...


4

In my copy* of Meditations the quote reads: Let this always be plain to you, that this piece of land is like any other; and that what is here is the same as what is on top of a mountain, or on the seashore, or wherever you choose; as Plato says of his philosopher, whose retreat is "like a shepherd's fold on a mountain." ...and has an annotation ...


3

Why do you suppose he says this, and does he want us to thirst to read his book? Answering the second part first, no, he doesn't want us to thirst to read his book. The Meditations weren't written as a book for others; they were Marcus Aurelius writing for himself. The fact that they were published and are still being read today was not, I think, any ...


3

The Enchiridion of Epictetus contains a number of comments very close to this. It is possible that there is another source that gets even closer to your quotation, but I wonder if Tolle is thinking of these comments of Epictetus and paraphrasing them, or not remembering them precisely. (And of course, I am relying on a translation, too!) Here are some of ...


3

Look at footnote 121 on page 52 of this link, talking about what the Stoic philosopher Chrysippus said: "Here it was replied that [children and animals] were not subject to [passions], but only to states that resembled them, but were much less persistent, not being rooted in reason." So apparently he believed that passions require reason, which is somewhat ...


3

According to the Stoic theory, there are eight parts of the soul, the "commanding faculty","ἡγεμονιχόν", or mind, the five senses, voice and certain aspects of reproduction. The mind, which is located at the heart, is a center that controls the other soul-parts as well as the body, and that receives and processes information supplied by the subordinate parts....


3

The idea predates Stoics and is rooted in Greek mythology, the three Moirai ("apportioners"), goddesses of Fate, weave everybody's thread of life, and cut it, so that the nature may take its course without obstruction. Historians link beliefs in fate in many early societies to a largely helpless position of people who felt themselves like playthings at the ...


3

This citation may wel be related to Kant. However, Kant is so embeded in the history of thought that this one citation is not enough to point to a real correlation. One has to know about the way stoics and Kant see e.g. human nature, duty and free will and the difference in these concepts in those two separate times to make a real comparison.


3

I think you fell for a common misunderstanding about what it means to "let go of things out of your control". To be more specific, you accepted things to be out of your control when they were really not and you accepted failure for the sake of not caring. Let's look at your situation and fit it onto a stoic viewpoint. You spoke of "being late" so I will ...


3

I have noticed that I also do not seem to try hard to do certain things or at least, I don't put in that hurried energy to get things done like I used to. tl;dr: If that's how you experience Stoicism, then you are almost certainly "doing it wrong," as they say. My argument is in three parts: Stoicism actually calls you to an intensely active and ...


3

I can't really answer your question definitively being neither a deep expert in stoicism nor in Peterson's thought (I've done one graduate course on hellenistic philosophy and I've seen some of Peterson's youtube stuff), but given those caveats I will give it a shot. I would suggest that the two aren't that similar. First, it helps to understand what ...


3

Stoicism adopts a theory of oikeiosis, the root desire of all animals, human beings included, for self-preservation. An individual human being is, however, not only an animal but also a rational being. So self-preservation extends to preservation of oneself as a rational being; and this involves a correct attitude to things that are good, things that are bad,...


3

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (ca.1 BCE – 65 AD)'s quote is from De Consolatione ad Marciam ("On Consolation to Marcia", written around 40 AD) : this Consolation is constructed in the Consolatio tradition. Through the essay Seneca sticks to philosophical abstractions concerning Stoic precepts of life and death. For a letter offering solace, he notably ...


3

For many people today, it seems so! I'm not much into Stoicism myself, but I am always surprised when I use "philosophy" as a search term in, say, book markets, to see how much Stoicism pops up. As a popular book topic on the "philosophy" shelf, it seems to rival "The Art of War" and "Atlas Shrugged," which inclines me ...


2

Of course, this depends on who counts as a "philosopher." In the title of the question, OP asks generally if he was the first philosopher king. I can think of two good possible non-Roman alternatives. Based on Plutarch's writing about him, Alexander the Great was a philosopher, since he loved learning and reading. Solomon also would fit many definitions of ...


2

I think if we try to take this statement in the modern context, we could interpret Epictetus as saying that it is better for you to let the little things slide than to become perturbed about them. People today do not own slaves. So we can analogize our children. It is better that we allow our children to misbehave a little bit rather than to be constantly ...


2

I think this is fairly accurate, but must be seen in view of the complex evolution and differentiation of what we now call disciplines. The logical-sophistical side of philosophy drew upon the dialectic of the law courts, the physics of the Milesians, the various cult practices, mathematics, and much more. Certainly, the Pythagoreans and the Epicureans ...


2

First, I want to throw in a giant caveat: I'm a contemporary ethicist not an expert on Hellenistic Philosophy. I did take one course on the subject in graduate school though from an Epictetus scholar, but that doesn't at all inform my guess here. The wording is slightly different here: http://classics.mit.edu/Epictetus/epicench.html but I take it in context ...


2

EDIT: A comment made me realize that I should probably mention I'm approaching this from an angle of their being a singular legitimate truth and that consensus reality is our best working model of that truth. ================================================================================== Necessarily everything we perceive must pass through our senses ...


2

What does this mean? It takes minutes for sunlight to travel from the sun to a beholder's eye on earth. The sensation of seeing the sun actually takes place in the beholder's head. The sensation is not the sun. The beholder utters "the sun!" This is only her or his opinion which expresses what she or he perceives. The cause of her or his sensation of seeing ...


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