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58 votes
Accepted

Is "This sentence is written in English" nonsense?

"This sentence" is an indexical term. An indexical is a term like "I", "today", or "this city" where the reference of the term depends on the context of the ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
14 votes

Is "This sentence is written in English" nonsense?

This sentence is written in english. Cette phrase est écrite en anglais. These are different sentences; they have different words to each other. An accurate translation of the first sentence into ...
wizzwizz4's user avatar
  • 2,160
4 votes
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Does a formula denote it's truth value once the variable is assigned?

P(x) is an expression of the object language. Everything else - assignments of variables, interpretations of predicates/relations, truth values and the equivalence sign between formal symbols and ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Can something be both a type and a token?

Answer It seems the answer is depends on whose entries you prefer. According to WP, there are two distinct senses of type-token relationships. But according to SEP, the first sense included in the WP ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.5k
4 votes

Can something be both a type and a token?

Consider the following "I came I saw I conquered". How many words are in it? In one sense, there are 4 word types, in another sense there are 6 word tokens. The type-token distinction is (...
emesupap's user avatar
  • 2,337
4 votes

Is "This sentence is written in English" nonsense?

"This sentence" and "cette phrase" refer to different phrases, one being English, the other being French. If you wrote "The second sentence of my English translation of "...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 5,631
4 votes

Why do some philosphers including Russell paraphrase this sentence?

In Fregean terms, a phrase has both a sense and a denotation. For a phrase like "the king of England", the sense is the concept of being king of England, and the denotation is the actual man ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
3 votes

What makes a system of syntax capable of being computable?

To me it sounds like you are asking some ill-formed questions that could be clarified if you were familiar with some basic concepts. You say the following: how do I make sure my theory is "...
BurnsBA's user avatar
  • 612
3 votes
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What makes a system of syntax capable of being computable?

You seem to refer to Formal Systems. A formal system is essentially a set of concepts (precise definition of objects) and axioms (atomic principles, which in the context of the current system cannot ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
  • 7,479
3 votes

What makes a system of syntax capable of being computable?

Define your new symbols in terms of your old symbols. Pay attention to grammatical class; your new symbols should have the same class as the productions which they represent. Then, you only have to ...
Corbin's user avatar
  • 1,202
3 votes
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Are There Finitary Logical Constraints on Converting Recursive Syntax to Semantics?

The sentences continue to make sense in theory, but beyond some point it just becomes too much for our human working memory to track. From this article: Now try the fifth sentence: The malt that the ...
present's user avatar
  • 2,500
2 votes
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What is the difference between syntax, semantics and pragmatics?

In general, semantics relates to what sentences mean, and pragmatics to how they are used. There is no clear boundary line as to where one starts and the other ends, because typically an utterance ...
Bumble's user avatar
  • 26k
2 votes

What's with philosophers and their use of quotation marks?

Short Answer Quotation marks are tricky things, and they can be used in a number of ways. In philosophy, there are several ways that come to mind that philosophers rely on beyond an actual quotation ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.5k
2 votes

What makes a system of syntax capable of being computable?

You can start by considering examples of reasoning within the reasoning domain you're targeting. Examples of the form, "from X and Y, Z would follow." Generate a lot of these examples. Be ...
causative's user avatar
  • 13.6k
2 votes

Wittgenstein's chess example

Clearly, he thinks we can learn the rules of chess without knowing the names of the pieces while learning the game, be able to ask relevantly, “What is this called?” a that is, this chess piece. We ...
andrós's user avatar
  • 1,240
2 votes

Can something be both a type and a token?

You've shifted your own goalposts halfway through. To reframe what you said: A - Five years ago, Frank's son was born. He named him Thomas. They laughed and played. But two weeks ago, the son died. B ...
Flater's user avatar
  • 1,330
2 votes

What makes a system of syntax capable of being computable?

You ask: So what makes one system of syntax capable of being reasonably (usefully) computable? I'm not sure that I can find a source for what makes a good formal system, however, here are some ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.5k
1 vote
Accepted

Wittgenstein, 4.063

The possibility of a spot to be whether black or white is the form of a spot. And it illustrates that the form of the proposition assumes that it may be either true or false. Yes, that is indeed the ...
Julio Di Egidio - inactive's user avatar
1 vote

Wittgenstein's chess example

We may say: it only makes sense for someone to ask what something is called if he already knows how to make use of the name. This appears to be the main point of Wittgenstein's passage, and it is ...
causative's user avatar
  • 13.6k
1 vote

What makes a system of syntax capable of being computable?

So what makes one system of syntax capable of being reasonably (usefully) computable? Any logical language whose logic you understand and whose vocabulary means real things. So you need to understand ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
  • 7,983
1 vote

Does a formula denote it's truth value once the variable is assigned?

Okay, Lemontree's answer is spot on. In a lot of systems like boolean algebra '=' is treated as a function. There is a function f(x)=x, but it might be better to consider the sign '=' as an identity ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.5k
1 vote

Is "This sentence is written in English" nonsense?

Disclaimer: I'm not intimately familiar with Wittgenstein and like many philosophers he uses language quite deliberately so that "nonsense" isn't just "rubbish", but where he ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 6,112
1 vote

What is the syntactic representation of mental content? Is that even possible?

In the gospel of mind, Representational Theory of Mind( RTM) is a view that mental states, such as similar beliefs, solicitations, and comprehensions, are characterized by their intentionality, or ...
Mwine Isaac Norman's user avatar
1 vote

Multiple interpretations of the same syntax in mathematics?

You're missing some points here, namely the notion of intended interpretation and axiomatization. Often one works from model to axioms. However the surprise can be that the axioms may have also have a ...
against very long user names's user avatar
1 vote

Is "This sentence is written in English" nonsense?

It's a mistake to think that there are such things as simple propositions and these remain eternally true because they are outside of time altogether. Some propositions are outside of time and always ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
1 vote

Is "This sentence is written in English" nonsense?

Self reference isn't a simple on/off thing. The more self-referential something is, the more it is prone to paradox. For example, "This sentence is false," can't be resolved into true or ...
user3153372's user avatar
1 vote

If syntax isn’t semantics, will we abandon syntax one day to tackle the first person perspective?

Answer If syntax isn’t semantics, why are we relying on syntax? Because simply put, we are not psychics. Communication requires a medium and a message, and a message has to be made out of organized ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.5k
1 vote
Accepted

The Indexicality of "Ask this question?"

Short Answer is, "Ask this question?" an indexically quarantined sentence? Depends on the context "Ask this question?" is produced in. In semiotics and linguistics, deixis can ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.5k
1 vote

Are There Finitary Logical Constraints on Converting Recursive Syntax to Semantics?

Excellent philosophical question! As Conifold has stated, there is no limit to logical reference from a theoretical standpoint, but there is from a practical one. While you are using identical ...
J D's user avatar
  • 27.5k
1 vote

Are There Finitary Logical Constraints on Converting Recursive Syntax to Semantics?

There is no limit on this structure of a self-reflexive and highly compressible* sentence. This sentence's function is iterative and each sentence that makes sense can have a child sentence that also ...
Bruce Kirkpatrick's user avatar

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