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14

The general answer that I am familiar with in regards Gonsung Long's argument is that he's engaged in a denial of essences (性 xing). And his point is that if being a white horse is different than being a horse in general, then the essence of horseness is nothing but a name, and being white is nothing but a name, and "white horse" does not pick out those ...


8

It would be helpful to know why you want to read the Daodejing in order to suggest a helpful translation. Are you reading it for (a) raw investigative purposes, (b) meditative / religious / ethical purposes, (c) academic purposes? I would recommend looking at the translation by Roger Ames and David T. Hall. The text is translated by two scholars who are ...


6

It looks like this is from Daodeijing chapter 27. Given that, I want to preface my answer by saying that I do not know of anyone who works in Chinese philosophy that believes in the historicity of Laozi (Lao Tzu). Instead, we believe this document to be a multiply re-organized text that includes many Taoist notions. (See for instance Franklin Perkins, ...


6

I think the writer is quoting the original text from the chapter "Essentials for Nurturing Life"" (in Chinese 養生主). At the beginning of this chapter, Zhuangzi says (since I don't have an English translation, I just put my literal translation and some understanding here) our life is limited, and knowledge isn't. If we get ourselves addicted into knowledge (...


6

The Law states that “no energy can be destroyed or created..." Not quite. In its classical formulation, the 1st law says that energy is constant in a closed system. As this isn't entirely true, it has had a number of reformulations to include rest energy and virtual particles. I'm not a big fan of them, scientifically speaking, as they require you to ...


6

Several thoughts on this (1) It would help a lot if "relation" were defined more clearly. Do you mean "share similar ideas"? Do you mean that one learned from the other? Do you mean they organize the world similarly? (2) "Post-modernism" is a pretty nebulous term that refers to a lot of different things, so there's a little bit of something for everyone in ...


5

Speaking from personal experience as a Christian with Taoist sympathies, although it's far from a mainstream line of thought in either Christian or Taoist circles, the cause of reconciling the two is well known, and has been taken up by a number of different thinkers. Part of the motivation may come from the fact that Taoism is largely non-theistic, which ...


5

Taoism is quite different from christianity, specially in morality and ethics (i.e. considering what is right and what is wrong), since: In Taoism every concept appears immediately with their opposite. In christianity, there is God, and be apart from God. Most of the concepts in the Bible arise from the idea of being apart from God. An example of this is ...


5

Given the text that you refer to, it looks like simple crosstalk where using a phrase ■ one person thinks that “a ■ b” means “the group a is not exactly the same as group b”, while the other person thinks that “a ■ b” means “the group a is not part of group b”. For example, passage B, is then ...


5

Tao Te Ching, Chapter 63. See e.g. Wordsworth Edition with A.Waley translation,1997, page 66. From a different translation: Lao Tzu, Te-Tao Ching: A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Robert Henricks editor, 1992, Ballantine Books): The most difficult things in the world begin as things that are easy; The largest things in ...


4

For your first question, it seems like you're still trying to codify, standardize or otherwise pin down the process of achieving the Dao, which is against the spirit of the sources you're quoting. Therefore I read you as an outsider studying the Dao from an external context, rather than as a student of the Dao yourself. From that point of view, your claim ...


3

I finally found a verse that appears to be very similar to the one I remembered: "The block of wood is carved into utensils by carving void into the wood. The Master uses the utensils, yet prefers to keep to the block because of its limitless possibilities. Great works do not involve discarding substance." http://www.egreenway.com/taoism/ttclz28.htm


3

During recent years, there's been some pushback at distinguishing the texts of ancient Chinese philosophy by school. Instead, it is now commonly believed that separating them into schools arose later as sides were taken and Confucianism (or perhaps better Ruism 儒教) became a form of state orthodoxy. Thus, in contemporary discussions, Taoism 道家 or 道教 is ...


3

Based on the provided criteria, I think you'd better get this one: "Tao Te Ching: The New English Version That Makes Good Sense" https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1727252241/ I've read about thirty translations, and found that this is the most comprehensible one. This book stands out of the crowd because it is based on the author's research breakthroughs ...


3

My favourite translation is by Jonathan Star. Although it is not altogether true to the original Chinese I believe, after reading many different translations, that Star retains the essence of what is being said, but delivers it in a readable and poetic format.


3

I've done a translation of the Dao De Jing myself, from the chinese version available here, and the aid of several different translations, in english and portuguese, and some slight different versions of the original (noted in some of the english/portuguese translations). Most translations seem too "mystic" to me. Many (like James Legge's) were made by ...


3

What others have taught, I also teach: The forceful and violent will not die from natural causes. This will be my chief doctrine. https://www.taoistic.com/taoteching-laotzu/taoteching-42.htm This site offers the following interpretation : The last lines could very well be intended as separate from the preceding ones. It's a simple statement. Those who live ...


3

It's quite the other way round. Our habitual reactions are mechanical ie "robotic" and contribute a background din which actually dilutes and degrades the freshness of the experience I take the farmer to be (represent) an enlightened being speaking to unenlightened folk. His laconic responses invite the others to a wider perspective The deeper point of ...


2

I would recommend the James Legge translation which can be found with notes here:- http://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/sbe39/index.htm and all on one page without notes here:- http://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/taote.htm Also on Sacred Books of The East, vol 39 (sbe39) is The Writings of Chuang Tzu, which in many places elucidates the Tâo Te Ching. There are ...


2

The advocate and objector in that passage are talking past one another by using different notions of "is"; the advocate is using equality, while the objector is using subset. Which one is correct depends on what you mean by "is" (or, rather whatever word or phrase was used in the original). Modern set theory can express these ideas so clearly that it ...


2

"Why does everyone love the Tao so much when they first find it? Isn't it because you find what you seek, and know that your sins are forgiven?" When I first ran across this bit from the TTC, as penned by my teacher, Gia-fu Feng in his beautiful translation (the first available in the West that was done by a native Chinese speaker), I was quite stunned by ...


2

Taoism teaches that a way of living exists that is compatible with health and happiness. There is a great emphasis on not explicating the way, but to use intution and experience to impliment or activate it. Christianity does the same thing but can point to a incarnation of the right way -- the life of Jesus.


2

To argue that the ethics and morality of Taoism are similar to the Christian is a rather simplistic argument. All the great religions teach similar ethics and morality. Taoism is a non-dual tradition, very different from the monotheistic tradition of Christianity. David Loy writes in Nonduality: A Study of Comparative Philosophy: "The first section [of ...


2

To give you a reference, André van der Braak wrote a comparative study on Nietzsche and Zen (worldcat link). As Zen is influenced by Daoism (or so Van der Braak claims), he discusses it, including Zhuangzi, in relation to Nietzsche. One of the subjects is indeed Nietzschean scepticism and (Daoist influenced) Zen scepticism. Another similarity Van der Braak ...


2

The good person teaches the bad person to make them better. The task of the good person is to help the bad person.


2

First, I agree with Virmaior's answer. Let me give a little bit of background on Sanskrit reasoning which may shed some light on the white horse. [I have taken this from Swami Madhavananda's comments on verse 247 of Sankaracharya's Crest Jewel of Discrimination] There are three kinds of 'implied meaning' or Lakshana- Jahati, Ajahati, and Bhaga Lakshana. In ...


2

If I understand the question correctly I believe you are referring to the totality of Dao within Daoism. @virmaior is correct that Tao/Dao is used in other Chinese philosophies as well but we shall limit this discussion to only Taoism (see Confucianism ethical Dao) Dao is something unexplainable/beyond comprehension (words can not adequately describe the ...


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