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13

The general answer that I am familiar with in regards Gonsung Long's argument is that he's engaged in a denial of essences (性 xing). And his point is that if being a white horse is different than being a horse in general, then the essence of horseness is nothing but a name, and being white is nothing but a name, and "white horse" does not pick out those ...


6

I think the writer is quoting the original text from the chapter "Essentials for Nurturing Life"" (in Chinese 養生主). At the beginning of this chapter, Zhuangzi says (since I don't have an English translation, I just put my literal translation and some understanding here) our life is limited, and knowledge isn't. If we get ourselves addicted into knowledge (...


5

Gongsung Long is 公孫竜. Now, 公孫竜 or Gongsung Long, is actually not a Taoist but rather part of the "School of Names" 名家 ( Described in Chinese at the link, 白馬非馬 = White horse is not a horse = Gongsung's claim. )) Now your question, In my thinking, a white horse category is a subset of the category of horses, so any horse which belongs to the white ...


5

Taoism is quite different from christianity, specially in morality and ethics (i.e. considering what is right and what is wrong), since: In Taoism every concept appears immediately with their opposite. In christianity, there is God, and be apart from God. Most of the concepts in the Bible arise from the idea of being apart from God. An example of this is ...


4

Speaking from personal experience as a Christian with Taoist sympathies, although it's far from a mainstream line of thought in either Christian or Taoist circles, the cause of reconciling the two is well known, and has been taken up by a number of different thinkers. Part of the motivation may come from the fact that Taoism is largely non-theistic, which ...


4

It looks like this is from Daodeijing chapter 27. Given that, I want to preface my answer by saying that I do not know of anyone who works in Chinese philosophy that believes in the historicity of Laozi (Lao Tzu). Instead, we believe this document to be a multiply re-organized text that includes many Taoist notions. (See for instance Franklin Perkins, ...


4

Given the text that you refer to, it looks like simple crosstalk where using a phrase ■ one person thinks that “a ■ b” means “the group a is not exactly the same as group b”, while the other person thinks that “a ■ b” means “the group a is not part of group b”. For example, passage B, is then ...


4

The Law states that “no energy can be destroyed or created..." Not quite. In its classical formulation, the 1st law says that energy is constant in a closed system. As this isn't entirely true, it has had a number of reformulations to include rest energy and virtual particles. I'm not a big fan of them, scientifically speaking, as they require you to ...


4

Several thoughts on this (1) It would help a lot if "relation" were defined more clearly. Do you mean "share similar ideas"? Do you mean that one learned from the other? Do you mean they organize the world similarly? (2) "Post-modernism" is a pretty nebulous term that refers to a lot of different things, so there's a little bit of something for everyone in ...


4

The problem you mention is the same for all philosophy schools and also for the sciences. Around a core of skilled and experienced practitioners and scholars there is a fringe of half-informed folk with a variety of opinions and conjectures, and from the outside it may be difficult to distinguish the facts and the actual teachings from the cloud of dust ...


4

For your first question, it seems like you're still trying to codify, standardize or otherwise pin down the process of achieving the Dao, which is against the spirit of the sources you're quoting. Therefore I read you as an outsider studying the Dao from an external context, rather than as a student of the Dao yourself. From that point of view, your claim ...


3

Not really. Postmodernism revives premodern ideas and fits together modern ideas with premodern ones. But you can't consider something postmodern that has never been modern, and does not contain or contend with modern presuppositions. Buddha and Lao Tzu did not have to contend with the unreasonable and unexpected success of Western science. So they did ...


3

I finally found a verse that appears to be very similar to the one I remembered: "The block of wood is carved into utensils by carving void into the wood. The Master uses the utensils, yet prefers to keep to the block because of its limitless possibilities. Great works do not involve discarding substance." http://www.egreenway.com/taoism/ttclz28.htm


3

To argue that the ethics and morality of Taoism are similar to the Christian is a rather simplistic argument. All the great religions teach similar ethics and morality. Taoism is a non-dual tradition, very different from the monotheistic tradition of Christianity. David Loy writes in Nonduality: A Study of Comparative Philosophy: "The first section [of ...


3

What others have taught, I also teach: The forceful and violent will not die from natural causes. This will be my chief doctrine. https://www.taoistic.com/taoteching-laotzu/taoteching-42.htm This site offers the following interpretation : The last lines could very well be intended as separate from the preceding ones. It's a simple statement. ...


2

"Why does everyone love the Tao so much when they first find it? Isn't it because you find what you seek, and know that your sins are forgiven?" When I first ran across this bit from the TTC, as penned by my teacher, Gia-fu Feng in his beautiful translation (the first available in the West that was done by a native Chinese speaker), I was quite stunned by ...


2

Taoism teaches that a way of living exists that is compatible with health and happiness. There is a great emphasis on not explicating the way, but to use intution and experience to impliment or activate it. Christianity does the same thing but can point to a incarnation of the right way -- the life of Jesus.


2

The advocate and objector in that passage are talking past one another by using different notions of "is"; the advocate is using equality, while the objector is using subset. Which one is correct depends on what you mean by "is" (or, rather whatever word or phrase was used in the original). Modern set theory can express these ideas so clearly that it ...


2

If I understand the question correctly I believe you are referring to the totality of Dao within Daoism. @virmaior is correct that Tao/Dao is used in other Chinese philosophies as well but we shall limit this discussion to only Taoism (see Confucianism ethical Dao) Dao is something unexplainable/beyond comprehension (words can not adequately describe the ...


2

First, I agree with Virmaior's answer. Let me give a little bit of background on Sanskrit reasoning which may shed some light on the white horse. [I have taken this from Swami Madhavananda's comments on verse 247 of Sankaracharya's Crest Jewel of Discrimination] There are three kinds of 'implied meaning' or Lakshana- Jahati, Ajahati, and Bhaga Lakshana. In ...


2

During recent years, there's been some pushback at distinguishing the texts of ancient Chinese philosophy by school. Instead, it is now commonly believed that separating them into schools arose later as sides were taken and Confucianism (or perhaps better Ruism 儒教) became a form of state orthodoxy. Thus, in contemporary discussions, Taoism 道家 or 道教 is ...


2

When Asian philsophy say that truth cannot be grasped they speak of the limits of the intellect and the nature of Truth. They do not usually mean that the truth cannot be known. This is quite unlike postmodernism. They may also mean that at the limit the distinction between knower and known must be transcended for truth thus that there is a sense in which ...


1

I cannot give a non-opinion based answer to your two explicit questions, but I can give you some context for the second: This is a ancient and durable argument for either idealism, which is the concept that spirit is more fundamental and "real" than body, which is somehow generated by spirit, or dualism, which is the idea that both body and spirit are real ...


1

There's a theory, going back to the Renaissance, but most closely associated recently with author Aldous Huxley, that all valid philosophies relate back to a single common core, independent of traceable common origins. This is called the perennial philosophy. If it interests you, Huxley has a book of that same name that explicitly references both ancient ...


1

The law has one implication for dualism, specifically Cartesian dualism. If the mind controls the body (as in causing one's arm to rise because one wants to raise it), then where does the energy come from in a physically closed universe of which the arm and the body are parts ? Raising one's arm needs energy but this cannot derive from a non-extended, non-...


1

Although I agree with Alex’s answer, I think the following offers a different perspective. I don’t think it is in the best interests of religions to link too closely with the “energy” concepts from physics. Energy is an idea that describes reality. Subjectivity is removed from this description and the description becomes data. We try to isolate our ...


1

Some idea of above, between and below might be illustrated by the following quotes: Lankavatara Sutra, Ch IV Perfect Knowledge, or Knowledge of Reality When appearances and names are put away and all discrimination ceases, that which remains is the true and essential nature of things and, as nothing can be predicated as to the nature of essence, it ...


1

It reminds me most strongly of Albert Camus' version of absurdism, in which people live their lives and strive towards moral choices, in spite of the "objective fact" that there is no meaning in any of it. This position is perhaps best captured in his novel The Plague which dramatizes the variant reactions of a group of villagers to an unexpected disaster, ...


1

I have not read Milan Kundera's "The Unbearable Lightness of Being", but I have come across it in a class. It seems quite similar to your description. I am unclear of the exact argument, but from what I recall, he draws on Nietzsche's concept of the "unbearable weight" brought on by the burden of eternal return. I believe Kundera refutes this burden by ...


1

Starting from Nietzsche, taking Perspectivism as the morality, I would say there is at least one established framework that applies. If the whole of reality is about negotiating power relations, and everyone is present to provide a perspective on reality and to attempt to assert will and live with maximal effect, that is not specifically about humans, it is ...


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