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10

There is actually a fair amount of material. My first three thoughts are : (1) that it is not profitable to consider whether corporations are metaphysical persons. There is no firm, clear, consensual answer to the question : 'What is a person ?' Referring, that is, to the sort of entity you and I are. Since we are unclear about this basic, metaphysical ...


4

Depending on the details of what Mr. A is complaining about, Mr. B's response could be a straw man fallacy. The reason is that climate change is not a problem caused by a single person, but rather by society as a whole thus requires a combined effort to tackle including regulating pollution, supporting alternative resources, modifying infrastructure to ...


4

An article by Gabriella Paolucci, 'Sartre's humanism and the Cuban revolution', Theory and Society, Vol. 36, No. 3 (June, 2007), p.259, gives some background to Sartre's remark. Sartre met Che in 1960. Here is an account of the meeting and of the impression Che made on Sartre : The philosopher was imnmediately impressed by Che Guevara's personality, ...


2

If hatred had no point, it would not exist. Let it do its job. At the same time, our ability to manufacture our own emotions is dangerous. It separates us from appropriate emotional experience of more value. You can look at this from the direction of Beck's cognitive-behavioral model. All emotions are of value up to the point where they begin to ...


2

It is true that ethics and metaphysics are distinct inquiries. Metaphysics is concerned with the most pervasive features of reality or the fundamental nature of reality. Ethics by contrast is occupied with concepts such as good, bad, the right, the obligatory, the permissible, the just, both to analyse and inter-relate them and (in meta-ethics) to examine ...


2

This could fall under a few different types of informal fallacies, but the strawman fallacy is likely the best fit: ...whenever you attribute an easily refuted position to your opponent, one that the opponent wouldn't endorse, and then proceed to attack the easily refuted position (the straw man) believing you have thereby undermined the opponent'...


2

The statement "some are" means "there exists at least one". The statement "there exists at least one" is consistent with the statement "all are". This consistency between Some and All has to be accounted for. Thus the I statement, "Some S are P" becomes: "The ratio of subject S, in relation to predicate P, (1) is larger than zero percent, but (2) is less ...


2

Angst is a key concept for existentialism and the foreign word has been adopted for lack of a good translation. It apperas to have the advantage of not presupposing that the unknown is some object but could be an extraordinary event or just anything unthinkable. Locus classicus and source of the name is a book by Kirkegaard translated with the title The ...


1

I think that one problem you are observing is the conflict between Eastern thinking and Western thinking. The way I see it, Western thinking was established in Ancient Greece with the writings of Aristotle and Plato, which were carried into the governing principles of the Roman Empire. Western thinking was recrystallized many years later by Descartes, who ...


1

AGNOSTOPHOBIA - fear of the unknown : agnostos = unknown; phobia = fear. Oxford English Dictionary - complete version.


1

"Fallacy" is the general term for misguided logic, but not necessarily deliberately deceptive. If you're interested in these, there is an amazing little book "An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments" which can be read online here. If your interest is in deception, you might find the short book "On Bullshit" by Harry Frankfurt interesting/helpful. Although, you ...


1

I would call it a Hasty Refutation: rejecting a general claim on the basis of a single or a few cases that seem to go against that claim. It is the refutation counterpart to the Hasty Generalization, where you point to just one or a handful of cases to justify a general claim. We would be making the fallacy of Hasty Generalization when we say: "Look at the ...


1

1 They are assuming that if the global warming theory is correct, only a particular causal outcome is to be expected, namely and crudely that everything and everywhere warms up, there are universal rises in temperature. It's a brutally simple application of modus tollens : i. If p then q ii. not-q iii. Therefore : not-p If there is global warming (p) ...


1

"Cast the first stone" fallacy The reasoning stems from the same root as the "those that are without sin among you may cast the first stone" maxim from Christian faith. Essentially it says that only those that are without fault may judge others for any similar fault. This is — of course — wrong. There is no error in pointing out that a certain behaviour ...


1

▻ FORMAL AND MATERIAL FALLACIES A formal fallacy is an argument that fails to fulfil the conditions of logical validity. A material fallacy is an argument that's correct or false - acceptable or not - depending on how the facts are. ▻ FORMAL FALLACY Formally the argument is fallacious. It would be logically valid only with the insertion of the premise : ...


1

First of all: "You drive, therefore you use fossil fuels" is not a fallacy in and of itself. But, in the larger context of this debate on climate change, when Mr.B offers this as a criticism of Mr.A's position on climate change, it is indeed a fallacy. That is, Mr. B is implicitly arguing: "You are saying that in order to mitigate climate change, we should ...


1

This isn't the title question, but the claim "you drive and use fossil fuels so you can't complain" is an ad hominem attack, more specifically tu quoque, saying that their behavior/character trait undermines their argument.


1

There's nothing intrinsically fallacious about defining a term as pejorative or derogatory --that just indicates how people typically use it. And for most people, the descriptor "conspiracy theory" is not used either neutrally or positively. I think what you're actually describing is an argument of the form: X is a conspiracy theory Therefore X is ...


1

Wikipedia commits the following logical fallacies in the quoted paragraph: Cherrypicking. The definition comes from a single source, John Ayto's "Twentieth century words" published by Oxford University Press. Unverifiable source. Since books.google.com does not have electronic text for this book, I was unable to confirm the entire definition actually comes ...


1

I would say a conspiracy theory results from a mix of two families of fallacies: one family relating to irrelevance (in particular, Ignoratio Elenchi or Red Herring) and the other family relating to illicit presumptions (in particular, begging the question or suppressed evidence). Ignoratio Elenchi (= ignorance of a refutational argument) happens when an ...


1

Don't allow hate to consume you. That way you only extend their victory: not only have they backstabbed you; they extend the poison throughout your life. Live your life well. Find your happiness. Don't let the past poison you - if you succeed despite them, then it's their loss. There are few things more sad than a person achieving their life's revenge and ...


1

Without a doubt Miguel de Unamuno, great philosopher of the Basque territory, staunchly Catholic, anti-fascist, and for our purposes, a lover of Europe's greatest philosopher, Don Quixote of La Mancha. I say this because Unamuno did many good things, but most of all he loved this knight. Unamuno serves as our medium to conjure up Quixote. What was the ...


1

It isn't the individual thief who is considered "evil," but the action of theft. There, then, isn't need for a concept of "collective evil." Evil is a conceptual attribute humans apply to an action or idea. For example, instead of "Evil Mr. A stole from dear Mr. B." you should think of it as "Mr. A manifested evil when he stole from innocent Mr. B." Thus, "...


1

This writing strike me as it could answer https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/concept-evil/ It suggest that what you are asking is the answer. I would correct your statement (if we would be talking about this say 20 years ago) then I would claim most people would say "Good or Bad" (not evil) and as @Canyon suggested word VERY bad or even Very, Very bad... ...


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