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39 votes

Is attacking an argument because it's machine generated an ad hominem fallacy?

It is fallacious to make the formal argument that a conclusion is false because of its provenance. It not fallacious to dismiss an argument out of hand because it comes from a source which is well ...
g s's user avatar
  • 6,375
20 votes
Accepted

Why is the question "Is there free will?", and not, “What is free will?"

I agree with you and the others that it's all a matter of definition. It seems possible here the most trivial reason may be the correct one: marketing. “Does free will exist?” sounds like a weighty ...
adam.baker's user avatar
13 votes

Can we know that something exists even if we can't explain or define it?

Gravity is a great example to illustrate that yes, we can be certain a thing exists without having the ability to adequately explain or define it. As with the case of gravity, we can observe it and ...
mkinson's user avatar
  • 507
12 votes
Accepted

Is attacking an argument because it's machine generated an ad hominem fallacy?

See genetic fallacy. In brief: This fallacy avoids the argument by shifting focus onto something's or someone's origins. It's similar to an ad hominem fallacy in that it leverages existing negative ...
Futilitarian's user avatar
  • 4,426
12 votes

Is attacking an argument because it's machine generated an ad hominem fallacy?

Are we really dealing with an argument if the text is generated using a method that does not involve any kind of reasoning or understanding about the subject? ChatGPT only generates sequences of ...
Jani Miettinen's user avatar
11 votes

Can we know that something exists even if we can't explain or define it?

You need at least some definition, but it doesn't have to be exact or detailed. You can't tell me whether "adfgiuadhfg" exists, because you don't know a definition of that word. A child can ...
HolyBlackCat's user avatar
10 votes

Why is the question "Is there free will?", and not, “What is free will?"

The concept of free will started on the subjective level: Most time, all of us feel to be humans with free will. Pressed to give a definition of free will most persons would say: I am sure that I made ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33.8k
10 votes

Term of art for ontological evasion

This technique is called abstraction in computer science. We say that the programming language implements an abstraction on top of the hardware, and that the abstraction is a higher-level language. ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
9 votes

How do we know we've defined a thing properly when all definitions have exceptions?

Do not expect to find a perfect definition. A definition is an expression of the meaning of something (the problem of the thing, what is a thing, is another), and meanings are intended normally for ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
  • 7,688
8 votes

Is attacking an argument because it's machine generated an ad hominem fallacy?

The problem with the philosophical ideal of judging every argument on its merits is that a human lifetime is not long enough to do it, by very many orders of magnitude. Like it or not, you will reject ...
benrg's user avatar
  • 1,241
8 votes

Can we know that something exists even if we can't explain or define it?

For something to exist, it needs to be observable, either directly or indirectly. Physical objects and phenomena can be observed directly and measured. Abstract ideas can be observed indirectly by ...
Pertti Ruismäki's user avatar
7 votes

Is Taoism a philosophy?

I do not agree with the other answers (at the time this comment was made, I agree with some of the answers now). Just because an eastern philosophy values different ways of doing philosophy (like an ...
notwithstanding's user avatar
7 votes

Do meanings of statements exist?

Meaning comes from the shared use of words in the relationships between people. Meaning is the resulting shared concepts invoked in peoples' minds. Materialism posits that these people, the modes of ...
Lowri's user avatar
  • 873
6 votes

How do we know we've defined a thing properly when all definitions have exceptions?

Several options to define a word. 1. Explicitly define a word in any arbitrary way you want and then use it according to your definition. This method often works for new terms that you invented, such ...
causative's user avatar
  • 14.6k
6 votes
Accepted

What is the rigorous definition of free will?

The general problem is that we know intuitively what free well is, though as of right now we still don't seem to have a clue how it works. And without an understanding how it works we have a hard time ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 6,658
6 votes

Is Taoism a philosophy?

Like many questions in philosophy, this is the subject of live controversy, and does not admit an entirely agenda-free, objective answer. I will outline some of the major points of view, try to give ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.4k
5 votes

Is Taoism a philosophy?

First, let me point out that this question blurs Buddhism and Daoism a bit. That's understandable; Buddhism has tended to absorb and co-opt other traditions as it expanded, so a lot of our perspective ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 20.9k
5 votes

Can we know that something exists even if we can't explain or define it?

If we can discuss something, and the participants in the discussion have similar understandings of that thing, then it clearly exists in some ontological sense. We don't have to be able to explain it ...
Barmar's user avatar
  • 1,808
5 votes

Can we know that something exists even if we can't explain or define it?

Perhaps this is a frame challenge, but I think the real question posed by the question you link to: "Why is it "is there free will?" and not "what is free will?" isn't so ...
JimmyJames's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What is the standard name for this mild form of dualism?

This is called Emergentism, specifically emergentism with regards to physicalism, the idea that the mental is composed wholly of the physical, but not reducible to it. https://plato.stanford.edu/...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.4k
4 votes

Is attacking an argument because it's machine generated an ad hominem fallacy?

I do not dismiss ChatGPT arguments because I know them to be invalid. I decide to not bother to engage with them because experience has shown them to usually not be worth the effort. It is an argument ...
JonathanZ's user avatar
  • 528
4 votes

What is 'an Ontological Evil'?

An ontological evil is an agent that is inherently (by its very nature) evil, as opposed to an agent that commits an act or acts that are contextually considered to be evil. The is related to the ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 20.9k
4 votes

how these two statements can be true at same time?

The simple answer is that sameness as you apply it in the two sentences is different in those two contexts. This apparent paradox is resolved by noting the equivocation in your term 'same'. That is ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
4 votes

Why is the question "Is there free will?", and not, “What is free will?"

All the debate concerning free will is about the definition. What is the thing we want to call free will? Some define free will as something real. Some define free will as something imaginary. But no ...
Pertti Ruismäki's user avatar
4 votes

Term of art for ontological evasion

Languages that lay claim to be more high level do not have a concept of pointer but they still need to have (a model for) memory I'd agree (with you: I haven't actually dug into the dispute) that, if ...
Julio Di Egidio - inactive's user avatar
3 votes

What is the rigorous definition of free will?

The best definition I have found is that free will is the operation of agent causality, as detailed in this blog post from the Information Philosopher Bob Doyle: https://www.informationphilosopher....
Dcleve's user avatar
  • 14.6k
3 votes

What noun describes the ideology that most things are scams?

Cynicism in its modern sense is the -ism most related to the view that other people have motives worthy of skepticism. From WP: Cynicism is an attitude characterized by a general distrust of the ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Is Kant's talk of "homogeneity" the deeper point-of-contact between his theory of categories, and modern category theory?

Daniel Sutherland (in Kant's Mathematical World) suggests, like you do ("per the Greek roots of -geneous and -morphism as "species/kind" and "form/shape," are there uses of ...
abracadabra's user avatar
3 votes

Is attacking an argument because it's machine generated an ad hominem fallacy?

It's obviously a fallacy to dismiss an argument without reason just because you distrust the source. Like dismissing the argument of a known liar might be a good heuristic in terms of where not to ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 6,658
3 votes

Does logic have a more proper word to mean something similar to dilemma but neutral?

In logic, dilemma is the term commonly used for an argument form that proceeds from a disjunctive premise to a disjunctive conclusion. It is entirely neutral as to the desirability of the two ...
Bumble's user avatar
  • 26.6k

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