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Are humans and other animals machines?

My gut feeling is that the other answers are carefully avoiding the elephant in the room: The profound feeling that there is more to us (and to a lesser degree, perhaps, to other organisms as well) ...
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1 vote

Are humans and other animals machines?

I think here suits terminology from a computer science. State machine is a device which switches between internal states in repetitive ways (cycles). In this perspective, humans are machines. One of ...
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1 vote

Are humans and other animals machines?

I feel like in order to be useful, we can't just define a "machine", we have to also define what is "not a machine". By some definitions it seems everything could be called a ...
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3 votes

Are humans and other animals machines?

This question is fundamentally about the branch of philosophy known as Ontology, which is broadly concerned with questions of categorization (among other related things such as being, becoming, and ...
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5 votes

Are humans and other animals machines?

One of the (many and varied) definitions of "Machine" in the Oxford English Dictionary is: A structure regarded as functioning as an independent body, without mechanical involvement. ...
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11 votes
Accepted

Are humans and other animals machines?

I like this question. It's thorny. Merriam-Webster defines machine so: a mechanically, electrically, or electronically operated device for performing a task. That is, there is an operator (the entity ...
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0 votes

Intuitively, attributes and properties are similar/the same; what, if anything, differentiates them?

Attribute and property in ordinary language are synonyms. However, what differentiates them is how a philosopher uses them. For example, Spinoza defined attribute as just the essence of a substance ...
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1 vote

Intuitively, attributes and properties are similar/the same; what, if anything, differentiates them?

Ultimately, that will depend upon how any given author is stipulating intended meanings. I would say that one may assume synonymy relative to the discussion over description theory in which Russellian ...
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0 votes

How does one determine the boundary of an object?

Objects which consist of interacting components are called systems. A car object is a system since it has many components like the breaking system, the engine, the indicating system.etc. Similarly an ...
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1 vote

'for some x' statements

Technically, both of those are right. The existential quantifier ("for some x") mostly just says that there exists AT LEAST ONE instance x, but maybe more, that satisfy the sentence. So if I ...
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2 votes

How does one determine the boundary of an object?

The obvious thing is that there is no clear boundary. The case of living organisms in this discussion is particularly interesting. I am Peter, a material "object", in a broader sense. But ...
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2 votes

How does one determine the boundary of an object?

As a physicist, and from that perspective only, the question is arbitrary. Within a system, in physics, we often 'draw' imagined dotted lines around parts of that system and regard them as ...
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4 votes

How does one determine the boundary of an object?

Disclaimer: concepts from my last book, I do Systems research. This is related to the Systems Theory. The object is the counterpart of the subject, being both the members of an interaction. An ...
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2 votes

How does one determine the boundary of an object?

Short Answer It depends on your metaphysical presuppositions. Philosophers have wildly different ideas on how to determine what a thing is. Pragmatically, one can resort to picking something up and ...
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8 votes

How does one determine the boundary of an object?

It's a pragmatic thing more than a linguistic thing. If you want to go to the store, you think about your car If your car won't drive, you think about what part of it is at fault: engine, ...
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3 votes

How does one determine the boundary of an object?

I think it’s largely a linguistic thing, since the object/objects is/are what they are however we describe them. A more intriguing question (for me anyway) is that if you dismantle a Rubik cube into ...
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0 votes
Accepted

When does 'number' become 'quantity'?

The problem here is etymological, not metaphysical (logical/mathematical). Quanti-(from quantus) -ty(suffix meaning state of) takes any value, the etymological meaning is "a state of accounting&...
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