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Per Conifold's comment, Moore's Law is an empirical law based on observation; it is not a physical law like Maxwell's equations or Einstein's law of general relativity or the Carnot efficiency of a thermodynamic process. Moore's law was driven by two trends in the technology of integrated circuit manufacture: 1) that defect densities will go down as ...


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Richard Swinburne, in his Mind, Brain, and Free Will, distinguished between objects which do not have an essence, but are instead just temporary collections, and objects which do have an essence. The term he used was "thisness". This term is translated from the Latin "haeccity". Here are a few more references: https://www.rep.routledge.com/articles/...


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You mean an essential property. See here: "an essential property of an object is a property that it must have".


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The Greek original meaning was 'manifestation' and in Jewish biblical studies is the distinction between divine revelation directly from God himself (to Moses) as opposed to a rabbinic based interpretation of oral law.


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Description is part of analysis. For instance, we know that the UK uses 'common law' and that Saudi Arabia uses 'sharia law,' but those two terms are meaningless unless we give a descriptive account of each. These accounts cover the basic tenets, principles, and ideals of each system, without value judgement; generally they reach for universals and avoid ...


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Stoljar presents physicalism as having a definitional precision problem, but this is fundamentally not true. Stoljar is correct that one if one presses any definition of physicalism hard enough, then it will break under the load. But this is a common problem for ALL ideas in philosophy -- per Munchausen's Trilemma, NO justification of any view can EVER be ...


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