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Is nothing identical to non-being? Consider: "Something cannot come from nothing" Inductive reasoning would lead us to believe that this is probably true, but we cannot assert this as an absolute or truism, because we do not have access to nothing. Every example of something coming to be is from something else. There is never a nothing from which ...


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Taking your questions in a different order. #3. Are the laws of thought logical absolutes? #4. If so, in what sense are they absolute (logically)? The idea that logic is concerned with the 'laws of thought' is quite old-fashioned. Since Frege it has become more common to think of logic as being concerned with the relationships of consequence between ...


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If a person declares himself to be both, a theist and an atheist, then the person should first clarify his/her concepts. Both terms are contradictory. Hence the answer to the OP's question is "no".


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Let's first establish that there are gaps in the scientific worldview, both intrinsic and incidental. A young, inquisitive person might well be expected to discover these and ponder them. First are what we might call the "Cotton-Eyed Joe questions": "Where did we come from?" "Where do we go?" The Big Bang Theory is all right, as ...


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Yes. Bertrand Russell admitted that the scientific stance is agnosticism, the existence of god/s has not been proved. But said he identified as atheist for clarity in debate, that he did not believe in deities so far specified. He pointed out that nearly all religious persons believing in a deity/ies is atheist with regard to the deity/iesof other faiths. ...


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For an example of an atheistic theist there is Thomas Altizer (1927 - 2018), professor of Religious Studies at Stony Brook University 1968 - 1996. Illustrative of his prima facie contradictory stance is the title of one of his books: The Gospel of Christian Atheism 1966, updated 2003. Altizer has a nuanced view of God which is intrinsically bound up with ...


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If different times are involved, then there is no contradiction. S can be a theist at time t1 and an atheist at time t2. It is possible and quite common for a person not to realise the full implications of their beliefs. It is possible for S to believe b1, b2, b3 and also to believe b4, b5, b6, without realising that b1, b2, b3 imply theism and b4, b5, b6 ...


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If someone has a dissociative identity disorder and at least one personality is theist and at least another one is atheist, it is possible.


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People who hold contradictory beliefs are sick. In psychology, this disease is called cognitive dissonance. In the field of psychology, cognitive dissonance occurs when a person holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values; or participates in an action that goes against one of these three, and experiences psychological stress because of that. --...


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Many have contradictory beliefs, though they may not realize it. Some may even have contradictory beliefs, realize it, and hold them all the same. Being both a theist and atheist in the strong sense of each term would be a special case of this real phenomenon. There's another answer you might find of interest though, which allows one to be an atheist and a ...


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At the hypothetical beginning of time before God had his first thought absolutely nothing besides God exists. Not even as much as the idea of "nothingness" exists. The absolute minimum unit of knowledge from information theory is a single binary digit. Nothingness can be thought of as represented by a single zero-bit. On this basis the absolute ...


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Let me see if I have your overall argument correct: Prior to the existence of the Universe, logic constrained how the universe could be structured or it did not If logic constrained how the universe could be structured, then God could create within those constraints If God could create within those constraints, then God could create ex nihilo Hence, if ...


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"Creatio ex nihilo" occurs all the time. The results are called fiction. These non-real objects do have value, and a major portion of the economy is driven by them. If you want to know whether it's "possible" for real physical objects to come from "nothing", that would depend on the physical laws of the universe. (You basically ...


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