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The short answer is definitely, and this is widely recognized. However, the influence was not direct and it is perhaps less accurate to cite Plato specifically than to refer to a Platonic and Stoic milieux in which the Hebrew scriptures "mingled" with Roman Stoicism and its Socratic lineage. The relevant hermeneut here would be St. Augustine, who ...


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I would like to reecho Mr. Gudeman's comments in the following areas: "The notion of God creating Man in his own image", is purely Biblical in origin, specifically, from The Book of Genesis, which "predates" both Christianity and Plato by several thousand years. Plato lived between the years, 427-347 BC/BCE and his Academy stood in ...


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"Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?" - Plato stating the Euthyphro dilemma. Are a god's actions forced by it's character, to choose omnisciently the option that matches fixed values? If so then, yes we can at least imagine an omnipotent being with no free will. Does what is good ...


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This is a version of the "problem of evil" which is one of the oldest and most difficult problems facing any believer in a God who is both benevolent and powerful. One of the oldest defenses comes from the Platonic/Neoplatonic tradition, to the effect that God is the source of all-and-only good things, and that those things are the only things that ...


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One day the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came with them. The Lord asked Satan, “Where have you come from?” “From roaming through the earth,” Satan answered him, “and walking around on it.” Then the Lord said to Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job? No one else on earth is like him, a man of perfect integrity, ...


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These vexed questions of theodicy have a long history dating back to Job at least and have troubled many great minds, producing many answers, including extravagant rationalizations like those of Leibniz or rejection of the idea of God, in the manner of Voltaire writing on the Lisbon earthquake. Obviously, we would not thank anyone, let alone God, for evils ...


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I would say, don't be afraid to read the major texts by the principal philosophers themselves. One of the reasons the great philosophers are considered great is that they are worth reading. That said, some are hard to understand. Some of the greats of the 'modern' era are Spinoza's Ethics, David Hume's A Treatise on Human Nature, and Kant's Critique of Pure ...


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