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The concept of time was derived at the dawn of human civilization from observation and awareness of the man of cyclical (repeated) processes in nature - such as: the cycle of the day and night, related to the observation of sunrise and sunset (although, as it is known, the true reason for this cycle - the Earth’s rotation around their own axis - was ...


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In its original form, the razor went something like, "Do not multiply entities unnecessarily." If theory T1 requires n unobservables and theory T2 requires m unobservables, and if n < m, then T1 is preferable (modulo the razor). Now with presentism, we don't have all times given. But with eternalism, is it correct to speak of "times" ...


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I think that the answer to this is basically a clear 'no'. Post special relativity* - think of clocks as like odometers, they measure what is called 'proper time' along the trajectory that they are moving; this is basically an interval between two events in spacetime (an event being a spacetime equivalent of a point). There is no defined meaning to the idea ...


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The time experienced by satellites can be computationally adjusted to keep them functional for GPS, etc. They do not wander off into their own incalculable time when unobserved. There is no reason that the same cannot be said for more convoluted space-time. Consequently the one-clock idea pertains. In other words, the 'now' moment is universal. To ...


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I think you are misunderstanding Eternalism, which to my eyes is essentially just another way of thinking about a deterministic universe. If the universe is deterministic, there is nothing special about the present. The present is simply the state of the universe at time t and no more or less real than the state at time t+1 or t-1 No reincarnation or ...


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There is no stasis (not even the idea of stasis) without movement, and vice versa. A circulating moving spotlight of a fixed context is thus one at least coherent depiction of an eternalistic universe. What else would categorize such a universe, as gleamed by Hinton, Mach, Planck, Einstein and William James, and succinctly codified by Lawrence LeShan, can ...


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Logic is derived from the human brain, as far as we know the human brain cannot function without time. So I am with you on this one, logic is dependent on time. That means all math and informatic which ignores time component is simply wrong and invalid in real world/universe, unless we believe in time travel and time standing still, but if time stands still, ...


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