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1 vote
Accepted

Certainty for the existence of tomorrow?

It is not possible to be 100% certain of anything that is not a logical necessity, which includes all statements about the nature of physical reality. The quest for certain knowledge about the real ...
Dikran Marsupial's user avatar
3 votes

Why is time, when viewed objectively, in reverse from when it's viewed subjectively?

One of the key notions of physics is that motion is relative- to say that A is moving towards B is equivalent to saying that B is moving towards A. Had you applied that notion to time, you would not ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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1 vote

Why is time, when viewed objectively, in reverse from when it's viewed subjectively?

Physicists know just as well as anybody else that wherever you go, there you are. In mathematical physics it is conventional to assign observers to the origins of their own coordinate systems. It's ...
g s's user avatar
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1 vote

Why is time, when viewed objectively, in reverse from when it's viewed subjectively?

Usually when dealing with physics related phenomenon like space-time or time cone everything usually should be seen relatively i.e., Einstein's theory of relativity works for this particular reason. ...
How why e's user avatar
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-1 votes

Can a non linear perception of time be the answer to the apparent contradiction between God's Decree and human free will?

First off, I'm a Christian not muslim. Ok. Now, I've been thinking how to solve the Omnipotence of God vs The Free will of Creation. And I've come up with a solution. One, that we need to redefine ...
Prince Michael's user avatar
2 votes

Certainty for the existence of tomorrow?

We can use the stars and planets to plot the trajectory (past and future) of the Earth in a 3d Euclidian geometry space. We can point along that trajectory and say "On this day the Earth was here&...
Alistair Riddoch's user avatar
1 vote

How can god exist outside of time if exist is a connotation of time`

You: I don't see how existence can't imply time It's not completely clear to me what you mean by that, but I assume you mean that, in your opinion, existence necessarily implies time. I don't know ...
mudskipper's user avatar
1 vote

Does the statement "only matter exists" denote a false proposition or a true proposition?

It's false since space and time, physical laws and minds exist. Furthermore one can say math exists. None of these are forms of matter.
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
2 votes

Does the statement "only matter exists" denote a false proposition or a true proposition?

The proposition is so clearly and trivially wrong that I wonder whether there is a deeper meaning or agenda here that I'm just not understanding. Matter (in the form of the 17 fundamental particles) ...
AnoE's user avatar
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1 vote

Does the statement "only matter exists" denote a false proposition or a true proposition?

The answer depends entirely on how you wish to interpret the words matter and exist. In everyday use, the word exist has a much broader range of applications than the one you have in mind. Likewise, ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 22.9k
0 votes

Does the statement "only matter exists" denote a false proposition or a true proposition?

The proposition was in dispute until Einstein’s relativity showed definitively that matter is not fundamental. Now we know the proposition is false. The fallback, “do only physical things exist” is ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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1 vote

Does the statement "only matter exists" denote a false proposition or a true proposition?

Matter is a highfalutin abstraction supposedly comprising the substratum "stuff" of the world. But we do not encounter matter eo ipso. We experience perceptible shapes, forms, and events. ...
Paradox Lost's user avatar
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3 votes

Does the statement "only matter exists" denote a false proposition or a true proposition?

It is a false proposition. "To exist" means the same as "to be observable". All matter is observable, but also ideas, emotions, memories and knowledge are observable things. They ...
Pertti Ruismäki's user avatar
0 votes

Static Eternity Model (SEM) - Thoughts, Ideas and Criticism?

I'm not a physics enthusiast, but not a physicist. I don't understand most of what's being said here. I will focus on a criticism on purely philosophical grounds. This theory is not meaningfully ...
Tim C's user avatar
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2 votes

Static Eternity Model (SEM) - Thoughts, Ideas and Criticism?

The primary problem with this theory is that it is written in a way that emphasises the importance of loops and cyclic natures, where in fact the theory doesn't seem to require non-linear structures ...
Dikran Marsupial's user avatar
2 votes

Static Eternity Model (SEM) - Thoughts, Ideas and Criticism?

SEM posits that the universe, in its entirety, is composed of a sequence of events laid out in a static four-dimensional block, where time as experienced by its inhabitants progresses linearly from ...
JMac's user avatar
  • 238
3 votes

Static Eternity Model (SEM) - Thoughts, Ideas and Criticism?

Firstly, the block universe idea of everything existing 'simultaneously' is not a consequence of general relativity. As a physicist, I don't recognise it at all. I don't know what has motivated your ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 22.9k
1 vote

What kind of free will does Harry Potter have while travelling in time?

Harry Potter is a character in a fictional novel, and as such, does not have free will - every action he takes is controlled by the author. This might sound a bit facetious or tongue-in-cheek, but I'm ...
komodosp's user avatar
  • 355
1 vote

What kind of free will does Harry Potter have while travelling in time?

Some conceptions of free will, compatibilist ones mainly (though perhaps not all compatibilist ones) see human minds as something like decision making machines. If the machine of your decision making ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 3,449
1 vote

What kind of free will does Harry Potter have while travelling in time?

Edited version, in honour of the charming Tkol... I think you have answered your own question. If the future is entirely pre-determined, in the sense that there is no possibility whatsoever of it ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 22.9k
1 vote

Model and implication of bidirectional time

One of Einstein's great insights was simultaneity (if there is such a word) is not universally well-defined - it depends in surprising ways on how you move relative to the events you are observing. ...
j4nd3r53n's user avatar
  • 219
2 votes

Model and implication of bidirectional time

Causality is a human concept directly "linked" with time. When a system progresses from state A to state B it is supposed that some kind of force(?) acts upon this system to cause this ...
Ioannis Paizis's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Model and implication of bidirectional time

I think you are mixing notions of time and causality, as in metaphysics or psychology, with the physical notions of time and causality. The laws of physics are indeed insensitive to the direction of (...
Julio Di Egidio - inactive's user avatar
3 votes

Model and implication of bidirectional time

To deal with you question about bidirectional time one first needs a scientific context. A suitable context are world models on the base of General Relativity. Here your question becomes the question ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33.1k
2 votes

Model and implication of bidirectional time

According to physics, there is NO present (see the Einstein's Train Thought Experiment, which shows that what is simultaneous to one observer is sequential to another); there are multiple possible ...
RodolfoAP's user avatar
  • 7,489
0 votes

About quantum interference: space and time

In what follows I am going to use quantum theory without modifying its equations of motion or adding a collapse postulate. In quantum theory the evolution of a measurable quantity is described by an ...
alanf's user avatar
  • 7,994
2 votes

About quantum interference: space and time

It was Schroedinger who considered the psi-function as the main mathematical tool to formalize quantum mechanics (QM). Influenced by de Broglie’s concept of matter-waves Schroedinger searched for a ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 33.1k

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