13

It's not necessarily the language, but the edition you should keep an eye on. As I wrote here, translations of Kant are problematic in and of themselves, partly because even German native speakers might understand some key points quite differently. But in English, the Cambridge Editions are quite a good standard and unmatched so far. When it comes to ...


8

It would be helpful to know why you want to read the Daodejing in order to suggest a helpful translation. Are you reading it for (a) raw investigative purposes, (b) meditative / religious / ethical purposes, (c) academic purposes? I would recommend looking at the translation by Roger Ames and David T. Hall. The text is translated by two scholars who are ...


7

TL;DR The Stoic way includes empathetic reactions, i.e. groaning/moaning outwardly, in moments of shock. Both because it is a natural reaction even the perfect sage cannot help against and because he should help others to overcome their feelings. Long answer A.A. Long has something to say on this in his book Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life (...


5

To get things out of the way, I wouldn't describe Hegel as an obscurantist (i.e., a philosopher or thinker committed to making his position obscure), but I would say he's very difficult to read. At the same time, I would say that Hegel is often obscure to 21st century readers. I would also say that he's a poor "author" -- where we need to understand that he'...


5

I think yes, of course it makes sense to read Hegel in translation. But reading it in English only and without guidance will not work. Think of the books of Hegel (and other contempory philosophers) and their origin: Summarizing past and basing future lectures. If you read this book while hearing the lecture of Hegel himself, I think with some effort you ...


5

I've heard (from the Dreyfus Philosophy 185 lectures available on iTunes U) that the Macquarrie and Robinson translation is not necessarily the most accurate. However, that should be balanced against the fact that it's the more commonly used and older translation, and I think for a long time the only translation, and the English terms they've chosen seem ...


5

Because of the double negation (no + unless) I would first try to paraphrase the sentence before trying to translate it into predicate logic. All the following have the same meaning: No dolphin sings unless it jumps All dolphins don't sing unless they jump All dolphins don't sing if they don't jump All dolphins jump if they sing The last one is easiest to ...


5

I suppose I would have to suggest it makes the most sense to read it in the language YOU are most fluent in comprehending.


4

I find it useful to read Heidegger with some translation notes as there are several terms that are not easy to translate. For example Stambaugh uses Attunement for Befindlichkeit whereas Macquarrie and Robinson translated this with the phrase state-of-mind, which in my opinion guides the interpretation where it shouldn't go. Befindlichkeit is derived from ...


4

A discursive practice in foucauldian terms is "the process through which [dominant] reality comes into being". This is a very nebulous process, of course, and Foucault focuses on questions of power. His notions of 'governmentality' and 'biopower', from his later work, are helpful to understand this. Foucault does not only focus on formal and semi-formal ...


4

Possible source : Beyond Good and Evil (1886), Chapter 2 The Free Spirit, §30: "Books for the general reader are always ill-smelling books, the odour of paltry people clings to them. Where the populace eat and drink, and even where they reverence, it is accustomed to stink. One should not go into churches if one wishes to breathe pure air."


4

The first published translation was to Dutch in 1675 According to the very recent paper Dijkstra, T. & Weststeijn, T., (2017). Constructing Confucius in the Low Countries. De Zeventiende Eeuw. Cultuur in de Nederlanden in interdisciplinair perspectief. 32(2), pp.137–164. (Available online here), it was not a Latin translation that has been the first one ...


3

Based on the provided criteria, I think you'd better get this one: "Tao Te Ching: The New English Version That Makes Good Sense" https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1727252241/ I've read about thirty translations, and found that this is the most comprehensible one. This book stands out of the crowd because it is based on the author's research breakthroughs ...


3

My favourite translation is by Jonathan Star. Although it is not altogether true to the original Chinese I believe, after reading many different translations, that Star retains the essence of what is being said, but delivers it in a readable and poetic format.


3

I've done a translation of the Dao De Jing myself, from the chinese version available here, and the aid of several different translations, in english and portuguese, and some slight different versions of the original (noted in some of the english/portuguese translations). Most translations seem too "mystic" to me. Many (like James Legge's) were made by ...


3

The question was asked on history stack I was criticize for not giving you a full answer, so I will try my best here. I've never used philosophy stack, so I hope I don't run afowl of any rules. Your thinking is almost correct, but not quite. You said: What I understand by her paper is that intellectuals in Europe and western countries control the kind of ...


3

I would say from personal experience that reading Hegel in translation is worthwhile. I would go so far as to say that all worthwhile philosophy must be translatable across languages almost by definition. Of course, a lot will be missed. Hegel apparently delights in words with double meanings, for example. Yet I too have heard from German speakers that some ...


3

Your intriguing question has two parts - why was 'idea' displaced as the standard translation of the Platonic εἶδος (eidos) and ἰδέα; and why was it replaced by 'form [Form]'? The first part is straightforward to answer. 'Idea' in the post Cartesian/ Lockean tradition has psychological associations that are alien to the Platonic εἶδος and ἰδέα. When ...


2

A detailed analysis of the quote’s origin in various Greek manuscripts of Diogenes Laertius’s Lives is available here. It starts with Agamben’s remarks and expand from it. Mostly philological, though it refers to Derrida and Sloterdijk as well.


2

The quote appears in Greek, unattributed to Aristotle, with the aspiration, in the first Sermon in Samuel Johnsons' Collected Works, Sermons, vol. 14 (the edition published by Yale). In this case, of course, it is interpreted as He who has friends is no friend. The subject of the sermon is marriage, oddly. It is worth checking out.


2

Just purchased the copy with a Foreward by Dennis J. Schmidt, just getting into it and mind you it is not easy at all. For those who enjoy some of Heidegger's own ideas, "in the margins" as Schmidt puts it, I recommend into looking into the copy that was done by the reputable press company of SUNY 2010. Happy readings.


2

I would recommend the James Legge translation which can be found with notes here:- http://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/sbe39/index.htm and all on one page without notes here:- http://www.sacred-texts.com/tao/taote.htm Also on Sacred Books of The East, vol 39 (sbe39) is The Writings of Chuang Tzu, which in many places elucidates the Tâo Te Ching. There are ...


2

For a mathematical example, see the "standard" epsilon-delta definition of limit : for all epsilon, exists a delta such that, for all x ... For a natural language example, see Jan von Plato, Elements of Logical Reasoning (2013), page 118 : A sequence of quantifiers such as ∀x∃y∀z is quite natural. There is for every person some problem on which ...


2

In The Ister lectures (p. 56, GA 53 p. 70) Heidegger refers to Hölderlin's translation of Antigone, and continues through that chapter.


2

Probably the best complete translation of Plato is : J. Cooper and D.S. Hutchinson (edd.), Plato: Complete Works. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 1997. Pp. xxx + 1848. This is better - slightly more scholarly and definitely more up to date - than : E. Hamilton and H. Cairns (edd.), Plato : The Complete Dialogues, New Jersey : Princeton ...


2

I myself study ancient Greek philosophy, — I'd refer to Francis MacDonald CORNFORD: PLato's Cosmology. The Timaeus of Plato. Translated, with a running commentary, by F. M. CORNFORD from 1937, English (it does not present the entire Greek Text, but a complete translation and phrase-to-phrase commentary).


2

I assume that we can treat x and y as constants (i.e. "names") : ~◊ (∃z(z=x) & ~∃w(w=y)).


2

This text itself can be viewed as scanned fascimile of the Latin at archive.org. A French translation appeared in Cheminer avec Descartes, dir. Thibaut Gress, Paris, Classiques Garnier, 2018, p. 191-212 (According to http://caphi.univ-nantes.fr/spip.php?article235 ) More information on it English occurs in "The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon" (see here). ...


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