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In the early 1990's, there were two socio-cultural movements that were "coming of age" on college campuses nationwide.....Democratic Multiculturalism and its more militant offshoot, Political Correctness. The primary aim of Multiculturalism, was to introduce into curricula, a more diverse representation of ideas from an array of cultures throughout ...


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A similar question: How can experts disagree despite having access to the same facts? TLDR: It is easier to agree on phenomena than interpretations, and many of the tools of scientific method are just systematising how to agree about phenomena, from consilience of evidence, to double-blind truals, to tests for statistical significance. 'True' as ...


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As noted in Heidegger's Theory of Truth ... by Huttunen & Kakkori (2020) Heidegger claims that the correspondence theory of truth exists because there is a primordial phenomenon of truth (Heidegger, 1992). In Nietzsche's terms, the primordial truth is the certainty of value judgements in the will to power. This casts truth as value. Will to Power, 291 ...


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If you have a belief about the matter (elementary particles) that is outside the domain of their existence you can be certain (or uncertain, what you wish) about your belief. If it involves statements about this matter itself (like how elementary particles behave or how many of them are in a certain region of spacetime), then your beliefs can be proven right ...


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We cannot be certain of anything. Entertain the following scenarios: The universe was created 5 minutes ago. When your brain was constructed, neurons were arranged in such a way that you have many memories about the past. You could not tell the difference between living since birth, and false memories. Information from the outside world reaches your brain ...


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Many teenagers in a high school math class will study a model of a baseball being thrown into the air, and then falling. A lot of these mathematical models of baseballs are different from reality. When creating a mathematical model, a baseball might be a perfect sphere. Real baseballs are not perfectly spherical, there are ridges and dents. Some mathematical ...


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Let me paraphrase the sentence: Even if there are metaphysical absolutes as we understand the term, our knowledge about them would still be human knowledge. In this form, I think it is clear that this indeed is an epistemological argument. It is not a claim about metaphysics per se, it is a claim about what we can ultimately know regardless of the subject. ...


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The concept of knowledge is a central concern of philosophy. Philosophy is the advancement of ordered, structured thought. But not everyone wants to partake, and dissent is articulated in the challenge; 'How do you know?' Philosophy has been on the back foot ever since, in the search for a basis of knowing. The Sceptics challenge is not entirely fair of ...


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You're right these 2 rival theories of truth do sound very similar in nature such that many people regard Tarski's semantic theory of truth as deflationary while Tarski himself regards it as a kind of correspondence theory. The subtle difference can be hinted according to SEP reference here: Philosophers often make suggestions like the following: truth ...


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