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Can a true statement be a lie? Depends on the definition of a lie, but the intuitive answer is YES. As a definition, let us use: Any communication with the intent to deceive. In this case, an obvious example of lying while making a true statement is called a 'lie of omission' to contrast it with lies of 'lies of commission'. There's an entire aspect of ...


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Yes. A lie doesn't necessarily need to be a falsehood from the liar's perspective, but only needs for the victim to be lead to believe into a falsehood. Example: Two astronauts are floating in space oriented 180 degrees from each other so that each sees the other as upside down. Astronaut Alice asks for the wrench. Astronaut Bob says "the wrentch is ...


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No sentence, true or false, can be a lie. A lie, or lying, involves mens rea, a guilty mind - i.e. in the case of a lie, intentionality by a person to deceive. More specifically a lie is generally defined as any statement that is false, known to be false, and is intended to deceive - where a statement is the declarative use of an indicative sentence. There ...


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The question is fairly ambiguous because it does not define key terms. But here are two examples. "I am in bed now" can be both a true statement (at night) and a lie (during the day). Also a more meaningful example maybe: Persons Alex, Bobby and Charly are accused of a crime. In fact, Alex did it. Alex tells Bobby "I didn't do it", and ...


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The correct quote goes as follows: The aim of totalitarian education has never been to instill convictions but to destroy the capacity to form any. It can be found in her book The Origins of Totalitarianism, Chapter 13, p. 468 in the 1973 edition by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (NY). The context of the quote is the argument that totalitarianism converts ...


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"To me the existence of God is metaphysical, ie it exists outside the realm of human measurement." Not really. It is quite possible that scientists observe events that contradict know laws of physics. And if god exists and decides to provide such an event then scientists can’t force him to repeat it. “Observable” would be needed, not “repeatability”...


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The following passage that I am quoting at length from Dag Prawitz ("Intuitionistic Logic: A Philosophical Challenge" in Logic and Philosophy edited by G. H. von Wright, Hague, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, pp. 8-9) may be more illuminating: Intuitionistic philosophers sometimes use true as synonymous with the truth as known, but this is clearly a ...


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In my opinion it must be about the "I" and the point is important today. Some think that the universe and/or our minds are computer programs or computations running in some kind of cosmic computer, or a simulator. Or an evil daemon as Descartes would have said. But even if this is true; even if we're just programs in some cosmic computer, or an &...


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why would Descartes bring "I think" in "Cogito ergo sum"? The reason Descartes didn't see the controversy, is that "I think" was an accurate description of how the mind works in some people. Descartes would not experience "thoughts", there would be no automatic thought process for him. Rather, the thinking was a ...


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Statements (as Kant suggests) have the form subject + predicate. Following the systems theory, this is essentially a semantic interrelation between two systems, which in this case are concepts: [Aristotle] <--> [Great] Statements have necessarily such structure. The rest of the elements of a sentence are just the syntactic and lexical auxiliaries. "...


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Strictly speaking it's an opinion and not a statement, unless there is some specific unambiguous definition of "great" that is all agreed on. Just like sentences such as "John is smart" or "Ann is pretty" are opinions and not statements, unless there are specific unambiguous standards of "smart" and "pretty", resp.


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