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31 votes
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If the universe is finite does that nullify Godel's incompleteness, halting problem, and Church-Turing thesis?

First of all, this question presupposes that mathematics is limited to describing the physical universe. Even as finite beings in a finite universe we can still try to reason about hypothetical ...
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18 votes

Why do some physicalists use the Turing Machine as a model of the brain?

A little background: there's a funny fact about computers that a very crude system with a primitive programming language can solve every computable problem (given enough memory). As we write better ...
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11 votes

What are the philosophical consequences of the undecidability of the spectral gap in quantum theory?

What the result means, essentially, is that in certain toy models there can be no algorithm deriving some macroscopic characteristics (spectral gap) from microscopic parameters of the models. The main ...
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9 votes

If the universe is finite does that nullify Godel's incompleteness, halting problem, and Church-Turing thesis?

The halting problem doesn't go away, even in the modified variant that would exist in a finite universe. A modified halting problem that instead of "Does this ever halt?" asks "Does ...
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  • 1,243
9 votes

Why do some physicalists use the Turing Machine as a model of the brain?

The Church-Turing thesis suggests that any machine we can build is no more powerful than a Turing machine. It is possible to run an approximate numerical simulation of physics, on a computer. A ...
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7 votes

Why doesn't the Chinese room learn Chinese?

Even if the man inside the Chinese room memorised every single translation instance (theoretically every possible combination which is impossible given our limited memory, but it's a thought ...
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  • 134
7 votes
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Why does Searle's room receive three batches of Chinese characters and two English instruction manuals as input?

I would encourage you to read the very original paper (here is a copy) ... If you read this from the very beginning, you'll find that Searle's use of three different batches of symbols is really in ...
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5 votes
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Is Turing test still serving as criterion of machine intelligence?

Before discussing this further, I’d like to highlight this quote from the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy as I feel it is particularly relevant to your question: ”First, there is the question ...
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5 votes

Why do some physicalists use the Turing Machine as a model of the brain?

Short Answer It's not correct to say that AI researchers model the brain with Turing Machines (TMs), rather it's more accurate to say that AI researchers understand that the grammars of human language ...
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4 votes

In what type of world is free will possible, if at all?

There are two different schools of thought on the possibility of freewill (barring the third school which says we don't have freewill at all): Libertarian/Metaphysical freewill: Determinism and ...
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4 votes

Why doesn't the Chinese room learn Chinese?

There seem to be several things not understood in asking this question. Searle gave an intuitive argument. He did not and still does not understand the details so there was a limit to what he could ...
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4 votes

Where is the knowledge that AI's "knowledge representations" represent?

In the context of artificial intelligent agents and AI, it appears that know is just the primitive connecting those agents to their representations of knowledge. In the 1995 edition of Artificial ...
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4 votes

Can computers do things Turing machines can't?

Short answer is no; modern computers cannot do things that Turing machines can't do. What they can do is run very sophisticated, complex Turing machines that simulate things that Turing machines would ...
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  • 1,457
4 votes

Human Mind vs Computer

So my question is: what is it that human mind can do which a computer (Universal TM) can not? INTRODUCTION Let us presume that you set aside the obvious retort: human brains are embodied and have ...
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  • 11.3k
4 votes

Why do some physicalists use the Turing Machine as a model of the brain?

A world-view describing question. If you ask whether the Turing machine is a model of the brain, the answer tells more about the answerer than one might guess at first glance. Neither classical ...
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  • 562
3 votes

Why did Turing say computers manipulate symbols?

I think perhaps the issue at hand is the word symbol. A symbol is not a picture. A symbol is a representation of some other concept. We might talk about the queen of England being a symbol. We might ...
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3 votes

In the Turing test how can the computer understand the interrogator?

The Turing Test is perhaps best understood as a thought experiment aimed at answering the question "if something purely mechanical could display all the perceptible signs of consciousness/intelligence,...
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3 votes

Why did Turing promote ESP (extra sensory perception)?

Turing wanted to eliminate any human ESP abilities from affecting the test. This ability could make it more difficult for the computer to fool the human or raise doubts about the validity of the test....
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3 votes

Scientificity of the Church-Turing's thesis

You want to be careful when you use the word science in the context of falsifiability. Falsifiability is a property of theories in empirical sciences, i.e. sciences that are based on observation of ...
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3 votes

If the universe is finite does that nullify Godel's incompleteness, halting problem, and Church-Turing thesis?

There appears to be a misunderstanding of the philosophical background within which mathematical theorems reside. Attempts to explain this philosophical background have been met with rebuttals that ...
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  • 146
3 votes

Is anything wrong with this argument about the Turing test?

The Turing test is not a formally specified experiment, bust just a thought experiment. As such, the specifics given in the original example are not important, a Turing test can be performed in many ...
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2 votes
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Is ESP, in particular telepathy, not computable?

Although it seems intuitively obvious that they are not computable tasks, how would one argue that telepathy, or other ESP tasks, are not computable? One would have to argue that there exists no ...
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  • 4,816
2 votes

Scientificity of the Church-Turing's thesis

The Church-Turing thesis is a non-provable thesis, rather than a theorem, because it is a claim that our informal, non-theoretical understanding of what counts as effectively computable is entirely ...
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  • 15.7k
2 votes

Why doesn't the Chinese room learn Chinese?

I believe that you've hit on what is typically referred to as the "systems reply", which is, in short, that the room system does understand Chinese. This seems plausibly true in terms of a functional ...
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  • 5,158
2 votes

In the Turing test how can the computer understand the interrogator?

But the computing machine has no sensory apparatus. It can't see the questions printed by the teleprinter in the computer's room. If it can't see the questions then it can't understand them. In fact ...
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  • 7,053
2 votes
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Book Recommendation for Computational Theory of Mind

Some suggestions, hope they're useful : Sebastian A. Wagner, The Extent to which 'Consciousness' poses a problem for the Computational Theory of Mind. ISBN 10: 3640896572 / ISBN 13: 9783640896578 ...
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2 votes

How could a computer acquire knowledge of its environment?

Let's look at "Chinese Room". The words traverse the optic nerve as a complicated neural pattern with no semantic significance. Once they hit the brain, the brain can assign meaning to the letters, ...
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2 votes

Why doesn't the Chinese room learn Chinese?

Consider the following about the Chinese Room Argument. First, strong AI is a view that programs running on Turing machines (computers) not only produce correct results but also generate ...
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2 votes

Why is Turing claiming that a complete and computable axiomatization of arithmetic would imply the decidability of first-order logic?

Probably, what he's trying to get at is that there is a way to encode in arithmetic the notion of 𐌵 being a provable sentence in K so that, if arithmetic was complete, then that sentence could be ...
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  • 610
2 votes
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Functional Abbreviation for Inst Expression in Turing's Paper

Turing is coding the "instruction table" (page 241). The standard form of a line in the table is: Qi, Sj, Sk, L (or R or N), Ql that means: "the machine is in state Qi and is scanning ...
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