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7 votes
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Kant's universalization explained, How does one universalize a thing?

What is a maxim? Jens Timmermann argues in his not translated book "Sittengesetz und Freiheit" (DeGruyter, 2003), Chapter IV, that there are at least three different senses in which Kant ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is Money, (not money)?

Aristotle in the Politics wrote about the nature of money, and his views remained highly influential at least until the end of the 19th century. According to Aristotle the purpose (telos) of money is ...
Bumble's user avatar
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6 votes

Can a universal law be disproved?

I need to know that a universal law like the First Law Of Motion may be disproved or not. I mean, that how can we make sure that the particular law will hold true at all places of the universe? '...
alanf's user avatar
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5 votes

Can nominalists believe in their own death?

I don't think there is a problem for nominalists here. I take nominalism to be the view that there are only individuals or particulars - concrete things or signs of concrete things, particular objects,...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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4 votes

Is consciousness universal?

Is consciousness universal? Given the rest of your question, universal here presumably means that every bit of matter is conscious. This is committing the same fallacies as the Trinity. Allow me to ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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4 votes

Why do realists insist that universals EXIST?

It is all wordplay about the meaning of the word exist. If there are ten apples in the universe, then you can say numbers exist. If the apples have stalks, you can say stalks exist. If the apples are ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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3 votes

Can nominalists believe in their own death?

All people, nominalist as well as realists, can believe in: One day, I will die. Or more general, they can believe in: One day in his future, each living being will die. That's the most simple ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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3 votes

Can a universal law be disproved?

We can't "make sure that the particular law will hold true at all places of the universe", and it is not possible to do so without deity-like omniscience. Proof belongs to the domain of logic and ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
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3 votes
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How is nominalism different to universalism?

Mr. Jensen, the problem of universals is usually a heavily obfuscated issue. So, pardon me if my post gets too long because it, since the problem of universals cannot be encountered, without clearing ...
Dennis's user avatar
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3 votes

Why is the third man argument seen as so decisive?

It's not self predication by itself that causes trouble here. By self predication alone, the form of beauty, for example, can be beautiful (thus partake of itself) and all will be fine. The trouble ...
E...'s user avatar
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3 votes

Question about problems of universals

The general triangle cannot be drawn because it is not a single shape; it is a shorthand way of referring to the common characteristics of triangles as a class of shapes. When we say the general ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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3 votes

Is consciousness universal?

Universality of consciousness is a typical position of panpsychism. According to the IEP encyclopedia Panpsychism is the view that all things have a mind or a mind-like quality. Mind as we know it ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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3 votes

Is consciousness universal?

This is one proposed answer to the signature conundrum of modern Western philosophy, the "mind/body problem." The mental and the physical appear to be quite different, but they also appear ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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3 votes

Why do realists insist that universals EXIST?

Can't we then simply say there is this particular thing, this particular thing and so on? We sure can, but then we won't be able to communicate, thus defeating the whole purpose of language. When you ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
3 votes

How do Thomists respond to the medical condition of aphantasia?

Not an example of an approach to the problem, by Thomists, per se, but at least by those who might advance the same local thesis as Thomists would: from the SEP article on mental imagery: ... not ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
2 votes

What have been the major achievements in the debate regarding platonism and nominalism?

Mark Balguer's Platonism and Anti-Platonism in the Philosophy of Mathematics is considered a critical text arguing that the ontology of mathematical objects is an open question such that there are ...
Lothrop Stoddard's user avatar
2 votes

How is nominalism different to universalism?

Consider unemployment and its caus(es): one stated simple cause might be that poverty in general is responsible, and a counter-position is that every person has the ability to find employment and ...
Luís Henrique's user avatar
2 votes

How is nominalism different to universalism?

C. S. Peirce* defines nominalism vs. realism (which I think you mean by "universalist") very well (CP 1.27 fn): It must not be imagined that any notable realist of the thirteenth or ...
Geremia's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the difference between "singular vs individual" and "universal vs general"?

Like all terms in philosophy, these have different senses in different contexts and between different philosophers. I think actually the common contrasts are between singular and general and between ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
  • 35.8k
2 votes

What is Money, (not money)?

The characteristic that sets money apart from other goods is that it is accepted and offered as a medium of exchange. Other properties of money, like being a store of value or medium of deferred ...
alanf's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

What is the division of philosophical doctrines with respect to absoluteness/relativity of truth?

This is a big question, and drives at the heart of one of the major unresolved issues in Western philosophy. It is also a multi-part question, which makes it difficult to answer fully. One part -- ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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2 votes

Can a universal law be disproved?

Of course they can be disproved. That is why they are called theoretical. Or perhaps I should not say disproved but rather appended. You use the first law of motion as an example, and that example is ...
Robus's user avatar
  • 342
2 votes

Can a universal law be disproved?

The short answer is that we cannot be 100% certain for all cases. We can be more certain for the "frames" where we can do experiments, but the further off we go from actual experiments it gets less ...
ghellquist's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Question about problem of universals

Ignoring the logical analysis of a statement or a proposition with all its predicates and qualifiers, natural language with universal concept seems the only way to communicate some epistemological ...
Double Knot's user avatar
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2 votes

Is nominalism generally considered to be disconfirmed?

There's consistently been an even amount of platonists & nominalists and this continues to be the case in contemporary philosophy, see the PhilPapers survey (actually, right now, there might be ...
kuro's user avatar
  • 141
2 votes

Do Universals Possess a Different Kind of Reality to Particulars?

You ask: (1) do others agree that a valid distinction can be made between the nature of the existence of phenomenal objects, and the nature of the existence of intelligible objects such as numbers ...
J D's user avatar
  • 28.6k
2 votes

Understanding the concept of "Entity"

Entity is something that is capable of performing an action on its own as some level of abstraction. A machine is not an entity as long as it is, well, mechanical. A machine that can "think on ...
Atif's user avatar
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