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There is nothing without prefiguration in philosophy; and the dead usually rise from their graves. So, to follow Mauro's lead: According to the standard textbook account, verificationism is a doctrine that was popular back in the days of logical positivism. The positivists promised us a 'verifiability criterion of meaningfulness' which would help ...


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The answer by Geoffrey Thomas is helpful, but a point made in the text deserves amplification. It could reasonably be said that verificationism lives on. But only because the question of "meaningfulness" has been mostly divorced from it: None of these philosophers believes in the 'criterion of meaningfulness' that the positivists hankered after. Science ...


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If even a single one of the implications of a theory is empirically testable, then the theory is scientific. Testing that one implication would amount to doing a scientific experiment. That being said, the word "empirically testable" means that there must be another theory that predicts a different outcome for that experiment. Then doing the ...


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When an academic researcher works on a scientific theory, they will do formal experimentation that is (effectively) proof of concept. They don't need to do much: an example or two that shows the theory works in principle is usually more than sufficient for the academic community. The real tests of a theory occur outside academia in pragmatic, technological ...


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