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Late Wittgenstein wrote that because he was very critical of Schopenhauer's philosophy. You may think his criticism was maybe too strong, but it is natural among philosophers to employ that kind of strong criticism. Wittgenstein has also been heavily criticized by the philosopher Mario Bunge, who said "Wittgenstein is popular because he is trivial" (Bunge ...


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Grayling was writing in 2001, so a number of Witttgensteinians of that time may no longer be with us. One who isn't is Bede Rundle, whose works are informed by Wittgensteinian ideas: 'Why There is Something Rather than Nothing' (2004) and the earlier Mind in Action (1997) are relevant here. Carolyn Wilde, happily still with us, engaged deeply with ...


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A language, by definition and in practise, is used for communication, whether privately amongst a group, as in argot, or publicly, as in language. Thus Wittgensteins notion of a private language is actually badly named, since in fact it's not langauge at all. But given that there is no term that described what he was referring to, he co-opted terms and ...


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A private language according to Wittgenstein is a language that -- in principle -- can only be understood by one person. Put differently, the meaning of its sentences and words is very principally only accessible by this singleton. The typical dummy of a private language, Wittgenstein fights, is a language of private sensations. According to this dummy ...


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