Tames
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Why do we naturally regard the unfamiliar as ridiculous?
Accepted answer
7 votes

Freud has written one text, known as the "Unheimlich" (uncanny). This term refers to something that seems to be unfamiliar and familiar at the same time, and this would create discomfort, because the ...

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Why was Socratic epistemology diminished?
4 votes

It seems that Socrates did not have a formalized knowledge theory. He contributed to perfecting the philosophical dialogue in the sense that you can only find some answer if you are doing the correct ...

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What are the characteristics of an 'objective' statement or argument?
4 votes

Objectivity can be considered as some sort of "pure information", in the sense that different people would have the same interpretation of it and would apply it in the same way. Information is rather ...

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Is this paragraph in The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine an example of a rhetorical argument?
3 votes

Rhetoric has three modes of persuasion: logos, ethos and pathos. These modes may appear alone, but usually they are combined. The subject of the speech will define which modes are adequate. If someone ...

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Rationality of Suicide?
3 votes

People almost always have "rational explanations" for the things they do. Two important, related points: 1) the reasoning may be flawed and the person is not able to perceive it 2) many things cannot ...

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Is there a name for an argument like "A implies B; B implies A; therefore A"?
3 votes

Maybe it could be considered a fallacy of misplaced concreteness (reification), that is, treating an abstract belief or hypothetical construct as if it were a real, concrete event or physical entity. ...

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Has anyone discussed the relationship between Philosophy and Poetry?
Accepted answer
3 votes

It seems that Heidegger, in his later texts, turns to poetical writing as the most adequate form of language to "unveil the world", in this way, poetic language would fulfill his work that started in ...

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Question on learning type in Plato Cave Allegory
2 votes

One intepretation for the Allegory of the Cave is that a person would get released through διαλεκτική (dialetic), this is what would allow the person to free from the chains imobilizing him/her inside ...

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What's the meaning of the idea of necessity?
2 votes

As pointed out by @MichaelDorfman, the definition of "necessary" is "that it could not possibly exist otherwise". A good example on this that might help you out is the relation between color and ...

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What is the practical usefulness of post-modernist sociology à la Foucault, e.g. of the insight that "insanity is merely a label applied by society"?
2 votes

As I see it, the most important point in this matter is that our society is ruled by conceptions of normality and these conceptions always leave someone out of it. As such, what is defined as '...

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How can one differentiate nonexistent entities?
2 votes

Reasoning/judging rely on language rather than on physical existence of objects (something you can see/touch/smell etc). That is why you can talk about ghosts, elves or even microbes that maybe you ...

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What is a good introduction to structuralism and related fields?
2 votes

Some structuralism classics are "General course in linguistics" by Ferdinand de Saussure and "Structural anthropology" by Lévi-Strauss. Linguistics is a field deeply intertwined with structuralist ...

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To what extent do we choose our beliefs?
1 votes

Pascal wager is an attempt to merge ethics with logic, in the sense that given there's a doubt concerning the afterlife, it would be more rational to live according to the belief that there is one, ...

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Is there an unambiguous way to state the biconditional in everyday language?
1 votes

Perhaps you could use the word "unless", but you would need to rephrase your statement a little. As in your example: ->I will buy you a wallet if (and only if) you need one ->I won't buy you a ...

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Why do we reproduce?
1 votes

For "why reproduction happens", and all the types of reproduction, you should take a look at evolutionist theory (specially, the differences between sexual and assexual reproduction may be of interest)...

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Will philosophy ever come to an "end"?
1 votes

Philosophy may breed other knowledge fields and these restrict fields may come to a point in which they are completely explored. But philosophy is much more than that. Basic philosophical questions ...

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The intersection of philosophy and commerce
1 votes

Some philosophers seem to be doing a kind of "applied philosophy", some sort of service similar to psychoanalytic work... i'm not sure how it goes, but it does exist. It is known as philosophical ...

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Does our limited understanding of the universe allow for the possibility that there are realms of communication that we are unaware of?
1 votes

I believe a parallel and more interesting problem would be that of persons who suffer paralysis of almost all their muscles, in what is called "locked-in syndrome". When something like this happens, ...

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How to prove you are an atheist?
1 votes

Not sure if this is a useful post, but I just can't help but mentioning that movie "The seventh seal" (Bergman). How do people react when they face death (last scene)? It seems that their reaction ...

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Is the claim "this coin is fair" falsifiable?
1 votes

My thoughts are close to those of @mwengler Statistics are useful precisely because there's no need to verify every singular manifestation of a phenomena. Statistics work with samples, you only have ...

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What is the fallacy in comparing evolution to a fairy tale?
1 votes

Great comments already. i just want to add a thing.. A very common mistake when talking about evolution is saying such things that "man descends from monkeys (frogs, cockroaches, whatever)". That is ...

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Is there a theory of knowledge that is based on suspicions rather than beliefs?
0 votes

Suspicion is oriented toward questioning beliefs and, as such, is closely related to criticism. It points to uncertainty, in a way this may be considered a kind of knowledge, but it is a sort of "...

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What should a rational person accept as a miracle?
-2 votes

As I see it, the definition of miracle would be something like "the impossible made possible", that is, a miracle points to a contradiction. E.g. - it is impossible to walk on water, for that to ...

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