Chelonian
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27 answers
votes
43k views
How can one not believe in god as the root cause of the universe?
42 votes

There are a few different ways to show that this argument doesn't necessarily lead to the idea of a god. Special pleading: You get to claim that everything must have a cause...except a god. But, a) ...

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8 answers
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7k views
Is there a fallacy about "appeal to 'big words'"?
11 votes

When presenting an argument, using any word/term that has meaning to some listeners/readers is not necessarily committing a fallacy. "New Keynesianism" (or, more commonly, "New Keynesian economics") ...

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5 answers
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601 views
How does atheism answer the problem of goodness?
8 votes

There are non-divine hypotheses for why people would be benevolent: The evolutionary advantage for social animals to protect each other's well-being (already discussed in other answers). In short, ...

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5 answers
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1k views
Why bother being good?
Accepted answer
6 votes

After clarifying that the question should only be taken as referring to moral "shoulds" (as opposed to practical or emotional "shoulds"), which resulted in this rephrasing: So why should something ...

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1 answers
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99 views
Which known philosophers are firm determinists?
5 votes

Galen Strawson, Richard Double, Ted Honderich, Derek Pereboom, Saul Smilansky. For links to further on these, see 2nd paragraph here.

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8 answers
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3k views
Is calling someone "stupid" always Ad Hominem fallacy?
4 votes

No, but not quite for the reason of the accepted answer. An ad hominem argument is of the structure: "A is so because Person X is a "bad" person." (where A is the proposition you are trying to ...

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2 answers
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190 views
Have philosophers neglected human obligations to other animals?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Have philosophers neglected human obligations to other animals ? No, not all of them. Which is unsurprising given how many philosophers there have already been and how important animals are to human ...

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4 answers
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246 views
How can inanimate matter provide subjective experiences
Accepted answer
4 votes

Yes, as @Schphol said, this is the mind-body problem, which is a ~2,000 year old issue that is still generating philosophy papers, books, talks, conferences, and entire professorial careers. How ...

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13 answers
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919 views
Sketch of a proof for real free will?
4 votes

I have read many contemporary philosophers and the mainstream view seems to be that real free will is an illusion in the sense that consciousness is an emergent phenomenon which is only set on top of ...

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3 answers
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548 views
Does God have the power to make identical universes through different means?
4 votes

You have defined A and B to have one point in which they are not exactly equivalent (their true histories). Therefore, to say that an omnipotent being could not make B exactly equivalent to A is ...

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6 answers
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200 views
Would it be sensible to say "I know Santa does not exist"?
3 votes

This is a question of the foundation of any knowledge. How do we know anything? Because it could always be the case that we are dreaming, mistaken, a brain in a vat, Truman Show scenario, the world is ...

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8 answers
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401 views
What am I missing in texts that say things that are so obvious as to seem pointless?
3 votes

I think your summary of Hume's points are shortchanging Hume. Let's take a look at just the first one to make this point. Most of our feelings about things are somewhere between joy and grief. ...

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1 answers
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128 views
Is materialism a philosophy accepted by the majority in western societies?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Is materialism a philosophy accepted by the majority in western societies? If polling results are to be believed, no. I base that on at least one good litmus test for materialism, which is ...

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8 answers
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7k views
How is the claim "I am in New York only if I am in America" the same as "If I am in New York, then I am in America?
2 votes

To understand this more intuitively, I think it's helpful to use formatting help and rephrase this a little, while keeping the logic the same. Start with this: “I am in New York ONLY IF I am in ...

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18 answers
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22k views
I have trouble understanding this fallacy: "If A, then B. Therefore if not-B, then not-A."
2 votes

"If A, then B. Therefore, if not-B, then not-A" This is not a fallacy because what it is stating is equivalent to this: "If there is A, then there must be a B--every time. Therefore, if there is no ...

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1 answers
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142 views
What direction does Ayn Rand's Objectivism give for making a decision that would benefit me slightly while damaging another greatly?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Based on her interview with James Day on the Day at Night program, particularly starting with this section, my guess would be that she would say that the proper Objectivist person would probably not ...

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3 answers
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125 views
What role does "DESIRE" play in materialistic determinism?
2 votes

Why do I desire a warm chocolate chip cookie? Perhaps my desire is simply the result of a chemical reaction in my stomach influenced by a smell of cookies that results in me eating a cookie. ...

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1 answers
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208 views
What does it mean to say what happens in your experience is inside your mind in a way in which what happens in your brain is not?
2 votes

In my opinion, Nagel is saying that "what happens in your experience is inside your mind in a different way than what happens in your brain is inside your mind" I think you meant to write that last ...

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5 answers
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242 views
Questioning determinism (example)
2 votes

I think there are a few problems with your scenario: First, you're treating lack of knowledge about the possible outcomes to mean that there are infinite possible outcomes. But you don't know that. ...

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1 answers
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675 views
Can someone explain Compatibilism to me?
2 votes

Sure. Compatibilism is not that hard to understand if you just start from the basic idea that compatibilists use the term "free will" to mean a different thing than--I think--you are using it. When ...

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2 answers
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228 views
Is the question of moral responsibility a valid one against determinism?
1 votes

There are really several questions here: Is the question of moral responsibility a valid one against determinism? That depends what you think moral responsibility is based on and whether you think ...

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6 answers
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766 views
Moral skepticism and "walking the talk"
1 votes

Keeping it very simple: some who are moral non-realists (such as myself) act in ways that could be called "morally" just out of personal preference. I greatly dislike causing harm or suffering to ...

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12 answers
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3k views
Why am I this particular human being?
1 votes

Based on my clarifying comment to your OP, I'm going to use the following as an alternative formulation of your question: "Why is my conscious experience associated with my body as opposed to ...

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6 answers
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2k views
Is freedom a paradox?
1 votes

The notion of freedom is clearly paradoxical. Only the notion of total freedom is paradoxical for the reasons you stated. But the notion of freedom itself is a useful concept because even given ...

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4 answers
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676 views
Can spontaneous body movements confirm or infirm free will?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Looks like Paul Rée got to this very issue back in the 1800s. So the answer is, yes, at least one philosopher has mentioned this issue of "arm flapping", as you call it, and, in this case, to show ...

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7 answers
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488 views
what amount of complexity is enough to warrant intelligent design?
1 votes

There's really two issues here. The first is a scientific question, and not a philosophical one. The second is a matter of philosophy, specifically epistemology (the study of knowledge). 1. ...

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4 answers
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401 views
How is free-will formally defined as distinct from determinism, randomness and determinism-randomness hybrid to support moral responsibility?
1 votes

First, I'm not sure exactly what you expect by a "formal" definition of free will. However, I will try to report about a conception of free will that "clearly differentiates it from determinism, ...

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3 answers
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253 views
Is determinism compatible with reason?
1 votes

Looks like there are two separate questions here: 1. Given determinism, does reason "hold" (with "hold" left undefined, but I'll take a stab at that). By "hold", I think you mean things like: is ...

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7 answers
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2k views
What point is Richard Dawkins trying to make here? Is it a fallacy?
1 votes

First of all, his tone suggests sarcasm, and that he doesn't think we should be agnostic towards fairies .... but, even if we were agnostic with respect to fairies, ... so what? That does not seem ...

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4 answers
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423 views
Continuity of our consciousness beyond physical life
1 votes

Continuity of our subjective consciousness (self) after death cannot be confirmed and/or proven in any way (scientifically, logically, etc.) I'm not sure about that. It depends what you ...

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