BeingOfNothingness
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Fundamental idea on proving God's existence with science
6 votes

I believe your claim that God is not well-defined depends on your taking God as a general concept. There are many scholars in many religions who have attempted to outline the defining characteristics ...

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What does model-theoretic semantics have to do with the problem of multiple generality?
3 votes

From my experience with the use of models in first-order logic, these can be a way of expressing truth-functional entailment. Think of a model for first-order logic as equivalent to the truth-table ...

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Imagine that you look at yourself as a cat, what do you think of your own behavior?
3 votes

A primary text on this sort of thing is Thomas Nagel's "What is it Like to Be a Bat". This doesn't directly answer your question but you will see why it applies to how you find your answer. Nagel's ...

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Is this analogy right?
2 votes

Not necessarily, it depends on how you define each of the words. Let us take three distinct cases and tease out how their definitions determine what classes as having those properties. An entity may ...

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Second Order Quantification without Ontological Commitment
1 votes

For those interested, I found the following discussion of a positive answer to the question of non-ontologically committing second order quantification: Nominalism through De-Nominalization (2001), ...

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Is the set of all true contingent propositions equal to the set of all true propositions?
1 votes

So, in short, the answer is no, but I can understand the intuition behind this. The issue comes from the nature of each of these things; truth and possibly. What is possible to tends to be divided ...

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Is it true to say that: The existence of any deity, based on current information, has a probability of zero but remains possible?
1 votes

It may depend on how you define both probability and possibility. If you define them in a similar framework. For example, a thing has 0.2 probability if it is the case in 20% of all possible world*. ...

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Role of definitions in analytic–synthetic distinction
Accepted answer
1 votes

It is conceivable that, given we assume "water" does not also refer to Ice or Vapour, but only to H2O in its liquid form, then it is an essential part of understanding the term. Both Saul Kripke and ...

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Is "the self" a relativistic referential abstraction? What current philosophy form does this fit into?
1 votes

I'm inclined to read "self" as fundamentally self-referential in all cases, whilst it isn't necessarily possessive in the same way as "my". "Self" seems, fundamentally, to signify some relation to ...

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Term for Deceptive Logic
1 votes

"Fallacy" is the general term for misguided logic, but not necessarily deliberately deceptive. If you're interested in these, there is an amazing little book "An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments" ...

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Basic question regarding the "Liar Paradox"
1 votes

Usually, the Liar Paradox can be formed of one sentence, where the paradox arises from self-reference; essentially, the sentence "This sentence is not true" says of itself that it is not true. Take a ...

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What are some essential quotes or excerpts from Existentialist literature?
1 votes

From Camus' "The Myth of Sisyphus": "The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man's heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy." From Camus'"The Stranger": "I looked up at the mass of ...

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Are there probability distributions that are analytically derived?
1 votes

I feel like the De Re/De Dicto distinction might be helpful here; De Re refers to the object specifically, and De Re refers, in some sense, to the ways the object is said to be (this will become ...

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Can nominalists believe in their own death?
0 votes

If you have the particular/universal distinction in mind, then it is likely that one who wishes only to proport the former will take individual events of death as particulars. So, either the process ...

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Is it right to say that pseudoscience confirms the past?
0 votes

P.A. Thagard's (1978) "Why Astrology is a Pseudoscience" might be helpful. It is both a reasonable length and very accessible. It is a breakdown of the discussion around the necessary and sufficient ...

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