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My understanding of the use-mention distinction is that the former refers to a disposition (behavior) or proposition (meaning bearer) while the latter is merely a reference (syntactical expression such as a string). In this way, dispositions correspond to correspondent truths (combining two individual cookies in results in a state of affairs that a box has a ...


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1+1=2 is a formula (an expression of mathematical language that express a statement) and "1+1=2" is the way to refer to the expression: correct. 1+1 is a term, i.e. an expression that denotes a number. Thus, it is not a formula. The principle of the Indiscernibility of Identicals (the converse of the Identity of Indiscernibles) in its predicate logic ...


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We have a very brief introduction How does Frege's definition of number solve the Julius Caesar problem? here on SE. Zalta's review of it for SEP is a good place to start more scholarly research. Dummett's book Frege: Philosophy of Mathematics is a comprehensive classical commentary. In 2005 Dialectica devoted a whole issue to the Julius Caesar problem, with ...


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On a logical level, (unlike J D's practical answer), let's suppose that neither side knows any factual property, (and for the sake of the question they don't get to find out), about policy change P, nor the qualities of group X, its polled subset Y, nor Y's two pro & larger con divisions or X-Y; other than the fact that Y_con outnumbers Y_pro say ten-to-...


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(Welcome to SE Philosophy, and thanks for contributing with a question/response! If you haven't done so, please take a quick moment to take the tour. More specifics can be found in the help center.) SHORT ANSWER Depends. The question you ask is one regarding statistics and sampling of population, and is a branch of study of it's own. Opinion polling is a ...


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I must point out that, even if one starts with a biased coin (in the sense that the probability of tossing heads is always P, tails always 1-P, but these are not necessarily equal), it is always possible to synthesize a toss for which heads and tails have equal probability. The procedure is simple: Toss the coin twice in succession; if the two tosses show ...


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