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I'm not sure Plato directly answers this question, but the dialogs clearly suggest the answer is yes. Plato frequently uses the metaphor of traveling closer or further away from the divine, immortal realm of perfection sometimes characterized as the Realm of the Forms. For example, in the "Allegory of the Cave", from The Republic, the mental journey ...


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Interpretation of the Platonic forms is a big wrangle and may be undertaken in many ways. But the simplest answer to your question "in what realm" might just be to say everywhere or in every "realm." Thus the "squareness" of a square, to use the old trope, is not "in" this or that particular square thing. In fact, any ...


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Conifold provides the reference, Republic, III.423e-424a. The rationale of Plato's proposals regarding marriage and the family is set out briefly by Julia Annas : Plato is not interested in the rights of women, nor in freeing women (or men) from the bonds of the family. What he is passionately interested in is the prospect of a unified and ...


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No. Nor does it originate with other venerable authors commonly implicated, Plotinus, Aquinas, Ficino, etc. Plato's "triad", as read into Philebus, was supposedly Truth, Beauty and Proportion, Good was the highest form uniting all three. The OP linked site presents some other "creative" pseudo-ascriptions of it to Plato involving Republic ...


4

When the Soul wants to experience something she throws out an image in front of her and then steps into it. Meister Eckhart There's an issue with your question. You say "his soul" ie "Plato's soul". Analogous to Plato's arm Plato's head Plato's Greek passport (so to say) Plato's wife even Plato's mind All these suggest something subsidiary to something ...


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If you're specifically interested in other physical realms that aren't part of the same space that we inhabit (i.e. you couldn't get there by traveling some distance in space), this article talks about how a French bishop named Etienne Tempier argued in 1277 that Aristotle was wrong to argue that the ground under our feet had to be a unique collection of the ...


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Some priests and priestesses who have thought a great deal about explaining their concerns, say that our souls are immortal. A soul will come to an end which is called dying, but at another time be born again, so it never perishes. Since each soul is immortal, each of us has already seen the things you talk about, and actually has acquired knowledge of all ...


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SEP itself refers to Platonism and Mathematical Intuition in Kurt Gödel's Thought by Parsons and On the Philosophical Development of Kurt Gödel by van Atten and Kennedy as the sources for this interpretation. Further discussion can be found in van Atten's book Essays on Gödel’s Reception of Leibniz, Husserl, and Brouwer and Conversations with Gödel chapter ...


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See Hartry Field's Realism, Mathematics, and Modality, Blackwell (1989), page 230: a realist view of mathematics involves the postulation of a large variety of aphysical entities - entities that exist outside of space-time and bear no causal relations to us or anything we can observe - and there just don't seem to be any mechanisms that could explain ...


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Max Tegmark answers the question Is the physical world isomorphic to some mathematical structure? with the claim that "The physical world is completely mathematical" and "Everything that exists mathematically exists physically." (page 1) This would be a claim than any physics model, as a mathematical structure, exists in some universe or somewhere ...


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One way to express the concept of half-life without math is to fill a see-through container with pennies, marking their volume on the side with a horizontal line. Shake the container and then spread them out on a flat surface, removing all pennies that landed tails-up. Then return the remaining heads-up pennies back to the container. Mark the volume again (...


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Any absolute statement about the future is subject to change. Will it snow where I am on February 19, 2020? That's impossible to say as of February 19, 2019. Will we find a contradiction in ZFC? Even if there is one, it's impossible to answer. Maybe all mathematicians are killed in the mindworm invasion of 2021, and nothing is ever derived again. Maybe ...


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The relationship between abstract objects and platonic forms is obviously difficult, as is the relationship between modern (specifically mathematical) platonists and adherents of Plato's philosophy of forms. While the latter may seem to have a bigger problem denying the causal efficacy of forms (per your argument) I am not sure whether the mathematical ...


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The answers to both "some kind of platonism" and "infinitely many universes instantiating mathematical structures" is no. Born is closer to Hegel than to Plato, and even further from Tegmark than from Plato. His views are described more systematically in the book Physics in My Generation (1966), the chapter Symbol and Reality: "In every field of ...


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No, Plato did not learn anything new about forms during his life on earth. According to Plato, he learned everything about forms when dwelling in a pre-existent form in the realm of forms. Moving around in the realm of forms, he became familiar with forms by intuition - a mysterious capability, described by Plato using a metaphorical language. Plato did ...


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We could go through the permutations of Platonism, nominalism, intuitionism, empiricism, and fictionalism. The guts of the question is whether, if Platonism is true, we can and do discover mathematical truths. Platonism is very roughly the view that 'there is a realm of mind-independent mathematical objects (sets, numbers) whose properties mathematicians ...


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Many early concepts of cosmology were quite finite; the (probably flat) Earth was surrounded by one thing and another on all sides, with as often as not a big lid, the Biblical "firmament", clapped over us. God's realm (and maybe also Hells of one kind or another) lay beyond. But many were pretty hazy about the scientific physicality of such ...


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Building off of @Conifold 's comment, here is a list of SEP articles which seem to contain contemporary off-shoots of the original "Problem of Universals". If anyone has a suggestion to add to the list, that would be awesome! Abstract Objects Types and Tokens Tropes Nominalism in Metaphysics Platonism in Metaphysics Properties Objects Ontic ...


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I think it is a mistake to correlate the analogy of the chariot and two horses exactly with the Republic's tripartition of the soul. In the Phaedrus: All three capacities, and not only a rational part of the soul, are given an essential and positive role in striving toward the good and the beautiful, and each capacity is represented as having ...


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No it is not stupid. So far it goes, it is right about Kant. As to Platonism in philosophy of mathematics, people give widely different definitions, often explicit that they do not mean to describe Plato's own view. So anything you say about that is likely to be right according to someone's understanding of the term.


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This is more a finitist vs non-finitist issue than it is about Platonism or formalism: Admitting that For no integer P(x) holds is sensible statement for a decidable property P is compatible with formalism, and indeed most approaches to mathematics. But even the finitist is not very far removed from the others: As pointed out in the question, she cannot ...


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Plato espoused equality in nature between men and women, but not for just deserts with regards to human rights... for the benefit of society: ...may we not further say that our guardians are the best of our citizens? ... Then let the wives of our guardians ... share in the toils of war and the defence of their country; only in the distribution of labours ...


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'Isms' are labels. They enable us to group theories, ideas, arguments, that have enough in common to be usefully (for some purposes) treated together. So, for example, empiricism is the label for theories &c. which assume that experience is the only source of knowledge, or the major source of knowledge, or the sole source of one kind - or some kinds - of ...


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There is a tension. If we agree to characterize the platonist point of view (in mathematics) as: the metaphysical view that there are abstract mathematical objects whose existence is independent of us and our language, thought, and practices, then Macbeth's point of view is summarized in the Conclusion: a good mathematical notation serves not merely to ...


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