New answers tagged

0

The analogy of simulations is useful to answer your question. WITHIN a simulation, entities that depend on that simulation's created environment, can die. We see that repeatedly in many simulations. Alternatively, if the entity is the creator of a simulation, then death for that entity, within that simulation, does not then lead to a coherent logical ...


0

People have certainly believed themselves to have died, then woken up to find that they haven't (zombies being an obvious example). People have also died of shock-induced effects such as a heart attack following severe psychological trauma (it is particularly common among small birds and mammals who escape a predator). A few will likely have suffered both - ...


1

If you assume you are living in a simulation then you assume part of your existence does not belong to that simulation. The user in that simulation must have certain features that make them capable of interaction with the simulation which were not created by the simulation in the first place. eg.1 "The world is a 3d computer game and your body is just your ...


1

Is dying in a simulation -- any simulation at all -- ever physically sufficient to die at that instant outside it? It depends on the definition of simulation. In the Matrix, a narrative, simulation is defined as such that the physical processes of generating the simulation and the life of the biological organism are intertwined and that death in the ...


0

One thing that we do know about the Tractatus is that in it propositions with more numbers are supposed to be clarifications, (or perhaps reactions) of the propositions that have less numbers (so all propositions are clarifications to the 7 main propositions). In particular proposition 6.4311 is a clarification of 6.431. There are just two propositions that ...


Top 50 recent answers are included