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Our attitude towards death is learned but we do have a choice to unlearn. What proof is there that death is bad? It is fashionable to discount the belief in Heaven but who discounts the much more common fear of death? What if our attitude towards death is the most powerful deterministic factor in the quality of life lived? In other words, if you see death as ...


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Albert Camus wrote in the preface to The Myth of Sisyphus The fundamental subject of "The Myth of Sisyphus" is this: it is legitimate and necessary to wonder whether life has a meaning; therefore it is legitimate to meet the problem of suicide face to face. The answer, underlying and appearing through the paradoxes which cover it, is this: even if one ...


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Can we render death harmless to us by perfecting life, as the ancient Epicureans and Stoics seemed to think? It might seem so, for after we perfect life— assuming we can—persisting would not make life any better. Dying earlier rather than later would shorten life, but a longer perfect life is no better than a shorter perfect life, so dying would ...


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The Harm Thesis cited in the OPs question essentially defines the harmfulness of death by how bad death is vs not being dead. The common assumption that death is harmful is based on the idea that your state of being alive is better than a state of being dead. If you are in a state of chronic pain and suffering, then being alive could be perceived as more ...


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I don't think this is really a philosophical question, but I'll weigh in anyway... This is like asking "What can I deduce about a person from his fingernails." Answer: The person has fingers. Back to your question, they may be speaking out of selfishness, empathy, a combination of both or none of the above. Comforting someone who has suffered a major loss ...


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Here is the question: What is the rational, or most rational, response to finding out you're about to die? Not just to mortality, but that there's little more you can do in your life, and you're soon going to be, or are, dying? What would atheist existentialists say? Ronald Aronson cites Ablert Camus, an atheist existentialist, in The Myth of Sisyphus, “...


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