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1 vote

Is the question of Identity more difficult than the question of Free Will?

Short answer The short answer is a definitive "YES"!!!! Free will has three fairly well defined answers debated in philosophic circles: Incompatible determinism (we have no free will) ...
Dcleve's user avatar
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0 votes

Paradox of the Loving "I": Is there any theory to answer my Paradox?

For the specifics you should probably consult a neuroscientist. But my concept of this would be that our mind-body-system is a network of semi-autonomous subsystems. What I mean by that is, that on ...
haxor789's user avatar
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1 vote

Is the question of Identity more difficult than the question of Free Will?

Reductionist approaches to free will do not depend on a definition of human psychological identity, and those are typically compatibilist approaches. Whichever smallest part of a physical or digital ...
tkruse's user avatar
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0 votes

Paradox of the Loving "I": Is there any theory to answer my Paradox?

A pair-bond could be a very real (if not a readily apparent) phenomenon, if we consider how it might work on subconscious level. Yes, on the level of the conscious awareness the partners remain ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
0 votes

Paradox of the Loving "I": Is there any theory to answer my Paradox?

I am pretty sure you are making an informal fallacy (e.g. a mistake in reasoning due to the ambiguity of natural languages). A clearly example of an informal fallacy is: 1: Miley Cyrus is a star. 2: A ...
E Tam's user avatar
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0 votes

Paradox of the Loving "I": Is there any theory to answer my Paradox?

You are over thinking it. People interact with their environment. If a person has consistent environmental factors over a significant period of time, they develop behaviour patters that are inevitably ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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1 vote

Is the question of Identity more difficult than the question of Free Will?

That’s a great question! Here is one way to approach it: think machine learning AI, like ChatGPT, or DeepMind’s AlphaZero, the greatest chess player ever. Do they have agency? I think the answer has ...
Yuri Zavorotny's user avatar
1 vote

Is the question of Identity more difficult than the question of Free Will?

The "I", the "self", or the "agent" is the conscious part of the organism which also experiences the acts of will in the sensory-perceptions. Perceptual Control Theory (...
SystemTheory's user avatar
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1 vote

Are identical sets distinct objects?

Mathematical objects have "no hair", no identifying properties besides the ones that are specifically given (a name, relations to other mathematical entities). Every time a name for such an ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
0 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

Two identical sets–or two identical of anything if we really want to get philosophical–can either be two distinct objects if they are two instantiations of the same blueprint, or one object if they ...
trndjc's user avatar
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0 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

Two boxes containing the same number of eggs are not identical. They are equivalent and based on the definition of "egg". No two eggs are identical (same for snowflakes) so two boxes with ...
Idiosyncratic Soul's user avatar
3 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

I find it amusing that almost all the answers — Kevin an exception — take the math pov as the default or even the only one even though the number of people today playing around with programming is ...
Rushi's user avatar
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2 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

It depends if we are speaking in the instantaneous abstract present, or whether they have external, ongoing, or variable contextual meaning. Generally, if A is the set [1, 2, 3], then that's it and it ...
Dewi Morgan's user avatar
3 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

Not all that one might naively categorize as identical is philosophically identical, and I do not mean that it's because of small differences. A set of indexed locations in RAM is not a different set ...
g s's user avatar
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2 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

Thinking of sets as boxes, are A and B separate boxes with the same contents, or just two ways of describing the same box? Sets are not boxes. They are collections. The collection itself is only ...
Stef's user avatar
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2 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

Sets are uniquely determined by their elements. If you have only one thing no. 1, one thing no. 2 and one thing no. 3, then you have only one set A = B But if you have three things no 1,2,3 and ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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14 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

If two things are identical, shouldn't they point to the same thing, not separate identical things? This sounds like a computer science question, not a philosophy question. In math and philosophy, it ...
Kevin's user avatar
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24 votes

Are identical sets distinct objects?

In math we've decided that if two sets have exactly the same elements then they are the same set. This is taken to be one of the fundamental properties of the mathematical conception of sets, and it ...
JonathanZ's user avatar
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1 vote

I wanted to ask about "EGO", how philosophers have defined ego?

Merriam-Webster lists the three basic meanings of the word. At the most basic level, ego denotes that part of the perceiving and thinking entity which is not anything else. Little children as well as ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar

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