11 votes

Is it possible to imagine a color one has never seen before?

The answer is controversial. Hume, 18th century British philosopher, famously argued that such a possibility is conceivable, that if we are presented with a spectrum of color where some intermediate ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.1k
10 votes
Accepted

Is color a hallucination?

A halluncination is to have a perception in the awake state when there is no external stimulus. Colour is not a halluncination. Instead, it is the result of our processing of visual stimuli in the ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
  • 31.7k
8 votes

Is something physical if and only if we can perceive it (directly or indirectly) with our bodily senses?

Referring to perception is an erroneous restriction. We can't perceive planets in far off galaxies, but that doesn't stop there being planets in far off galaxies or make them unphysical. Physical ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
  • 21.7k
6 votes
Accepted

How did George Berkeley justify his disbelief in matter?

Berkeley gives two arguments in the quoted passage, and the first one does resonate with Kant's later arguments. But Berkeley's came before Kant's. First, he says that the notion of matter is "...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.1k
6 votes
Accepted

What do panpsychists think a rock’s consciousness is like?

Everything we know about sensation indicates that it requires cells to react to a stimulus and cells to transfer that stimulus to where it can be experienced. If you cut the nerve cells between a man'...
causative's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

What are convincing examples of "mistaken" qualia?

I think the sticking point here is, as you point out, the immediateness of qualia. But that's not actually taken for granted in the literature. In the physicalism vs. anti-materialism debate in ...
commando's user avatar
  • 7,379
5 votes

Difference between Locke's Primary and Secondary Qualities

See An Essay Concerning Human Understanding : Book II, Chapter VIII by John Locke. Primary qualities of bodies. Qualities thus considered in bodies are, First, such as are utterly inseparable from ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
5 votes

How do philosophers understand intelligence?

Hey this is absolutely a problem for philosophy, don't close it. Basically it's, how do we investigate what we mean by the word 'intelligence' which being a question of definition of a contentious ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
  • 21.7k
4 votes

What is the ontological basis for sentience arising from complexity?

David Chalmers takes the reasoning you describe and flips on its head: Levels of complexity can never account for the purely ontological nature of consciousness (his famous "hard-problem of ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
4 votes

How can we understand the "intentional fallacy" mentioned by Pylyshyn?

Pasnau calls this the "content fallacy", quoting Pylyshyn's alternative description of it as "the seemingly innocent scope slip that lakes image of object X with Property P to mean (image of object X) ...
Conifold's user avatar
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4 votes

What perceptual error is this?

Sounds like Sampling Bias to me. Andy's mental sample of gay men is more likely to include flamboyant ones than non-flamboyant ones, leading to overrepresentation of flamboyant men in the sample.
Kevin's user avatar
  • 141
4 votes
Accepted

Proof that red and blue are different

Your definitions of your terms will ultimately decide about the answer, and they are far from clear here. But indeed, your sentiment can be understood as correct: The difference is trivially there (as ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
  • 13.9k
4 votes

Can we ask an infinite amount of questions or is there a limit to how many questions we can ask?

If I am correct, you asked if, as humans, we can always find a new question for which we do not know the answer. This means that there will never be a human that knows the answer to any question he/...
Marco Altieri's user avatar
4 votes

Could color be a fundamental thing about the universe?

We have scientific understanding of a lot that is relevant to color perception, not only wavelengths but also of photoreceptors, how they relate to color blindness, etc. But the subjective experience ...
present's user avatar
  • 2,500
4 votes
Accepted

Is there any good argument that time moves?

Answer Literally, time cannot move, because time determines motion of matter by way of v=x/t. However, it helps to think metaphorically about time, that we are an object and time comes towards us. ...
J D's user avatar
  • 26.6k
4 votes

Is there a level at which energy and matter are indistinguishable?; viz. can space exist without perception?

If you heat matter to a high enough temperature- as existed in the first moments of the big bang- then the distinction between matter and radiation fades away, and physicists deal mathematically with ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
4 votes

Is the speciousness of the specious present specious?

Continuing the SEP quote shows that we can "perceive a relation between two [successive] events" by using memory. ... a paradox in the notion of perceiving an event as occurring after ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
  • 5,869
3 votes

Is it possible to imagine a color one has never seen before?

Yes, you can imagine new "colors", and there are physically meaningful complex colors that humans don't really see. Short version We see with our eyes, and those signals go back to our ...
Nat's user avatar
  • 1,995
3 votes

What is the physical world if everything is perception?

Here is a lecture by Noam Chomsky where he argues that there is no mind-body problem because we do not know what the physical is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5in5EdjhD0
nir's user avatar
  • 4,816
3 votes

In what ways is Merleau-Ponty following (late/unpublished) Husserl?

Good question, except that the answer is worth at least one or two doctoral theses. The question is way above my own amateur level, so perhaps this should just be a comment. However, as far as I ...
Nelson Alexander's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

How does Putnam's internal realism differ from indirect realism?

Indirect realism in perception is the view that we do not experience the world as how it is, but only through and via our interpretations of how the world is. Representation becomes a key feature of ...
Dennis's user avatar
  • 326
3 votes

Why is Sartre averse to "images" in consciousness?

To understand this passage, we have to note that Sartre inherits Husserl's theory of intentionality. For Husserl, all intentional mental states have both a content and an object. I am directed at the ...
transitionsynthesis's user avatar
3 votes

Is it possible to imagine a color one has never seen before?

It seems trivial to imagine something that is almost like blue, but different. Some can even imagine a super-intelligent shade of the colour blue. It does, however, bring up the challenge of ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
  • 17.8k
3 votes

Is art the object I'm consuming or what is happening within my own mind as I consume it?

Perhaps not surprisingly, different philosophers disagree. Kant centers aesthetics around the judgement of the viewer. Beardsley focuses on the artistic experience. Danto considers aesthetic ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
  • 30.1k
3 votes

Why that cave dweller is called a misogynist?

First, let me kill that idea. Anthropologists do not accept the idea that early humans were cave dwellers. While there have been a few groups of people who did, for the most part, caves are not very ...
Daniel Goldman's user avatar
3 votes

Can we see actual light (electromagnetic radiation)?

Basically, your question concerns the content of perception ("what we perceive"). As explained here, "content" can be understood in two senses, as in "the content of a bucket" or "the content of a ...
Quentin Ruyant's user avatar
3 votes

Classifications of experience

One way to approach these kinds of questions is to break things down into contrary alternatives: is it X or not X? The nice feature of this approach is that it lets you be confident that you have ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
3 votes

Why do I have the perception of a chair (or other objects) ? - first person experience question

Half-answer: You are consciously aware of a chair in your visual field because what you are consciously aware of is information available to the conscious subsystem of your brain. And your visual ...
causative's user avatar
  • 12.9k

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