42

While I'm not entirely convinced of the premises of the question, in general people seek out philosophies that address conditions of life as they experience it. In the marketplace of ideas, a philosophy may thrive not as much because of its connection with deeper truth, but because of its connection with present conundrums. In light of that, I'd submit ...


37

I can think of 2 reasons: Naturalism is the philosophy most promoted in public schools. With some exceptions, people tend to stick with what they're taught in school. Believing in a supernatural being that loves us used to be a widely accepted and even promoted way to view the universe, even in schools. That is no longer the case. The new standard is to ...


17

Jacob Ross, Rejecting Ethical Deflationism,' Ethics 116, 2006: 742–68 defines nihilism as : ▻ NIHILISM - DEFINITION '...the view that the notions of good and bad and of right and wrong are illusions and that, objectively speaking, no option or state of affairs is better than any other, nor are any two options or states of affairs equally good. Thus, while ...


8

If nihilism is more popular these days, I would argue this is because the ideas which guided people through life with certainty and optimism no longer enjoy a consensus. Nietzsche discussed the prospect of a post-religious world (God is dead, Will to power, Ubermensch), and was disgusted with the idea of an entire society driven by mass culture, which he ...


8

See R.G.Collingwood : Philosophy of history : Collingwood thought that history cannot be studied in the same way as natural science because the internal thought processes of historical persons cannot be perceived with the physical senses, and past historical events cannot be directly observed. He suggested that a historian must "reconstruct" history by ...


7

If (from a religious perspective) god supposedly created all the religious rules, Not all religions subscribe to this. Buddhism for example doesn't really talk about who created the rules, and instead arrives at the rules empirically (See the 4 noble truths). then why does every religion follow different rules? Different religions have different ...


7

One of Collingwood's major views about history is that while the past no longer exists, it is possible by empathic projection from historical evidence or traces to understand why historical actors acted as they did. There is an unavoidable exercise of imagination but of imagination constrained by the evidence and by the need for coherent explanation. In ...


6

Aristotle, Poetics, 1451b : The real difference is this, that one tells what happened and the other what might happen. For this reason poetry is something more scientific and serious than history, because poetry tends to give general truths while history gives particular facts.


4

I find that most modern quirks can be attributed to globalism yes, but specifically the internet. The internet provides exposure to elements you usually would not see. If you are of the same mind as myself, you believe that people are a product of their surroundings. That is how patriots and ideological fanatics come to exist and how unique cultures are ...


4

The way paradigms shift quickly in modern times is likely even more a cause than an enabling factor. Whoever has seen multiple contradicting views on one matter being accepted, then debunked, as truths through their lifetime will eventually find it unlikely that "the next truth will be any different" - and at the same time, see "truths are multiple, ...


4

This answer is just speculation Why it is popular: People enjoy it. They can act how ever they please because immorality is impossible. It also makes them feel intellectually superior with no more effort than understanding a short sentence. The brevity of the belief is important to the "nihilists" laziness of learning and so their intellect and wisdom can ...


3

Because people can afford it. Back in a time when most of our efforts were invested in surviving, people couldn't afford being nihilists. There were much fewer safety nets given to the people by the state, so you needed a lot stronger ties to family and the local community. Without such strong ties, even a small illness, or even just breaking your arm ...


3

Objectivism deserves denying, due to the apparent limits of the human senses. I wouldn't say this directly leads to nihilism, although I can see why a lot of people take it that way, which is unfortunate. The lack of an objective reality should only serve to open minds, making them more fluid and less steadfast in their beliefs, however it seems people take ...


3

The idea predates Stoics and is rooted in Greek mythology, the three Moirai ("apportioners"), goddesses of Fate, weave everybody's thread of life, and cut it, so that the nature may take its course without obstruction. Historians link beliefs in fate in many early societies to a largely helpless position of people who felt themselves like playthings at the ...


3

I believe Kuhn 2000, p.276 refers to the quote by Kuhn himself: "But my objectives in this, throughout, were to make philosophy out of it. I mean, I was perfectly willing to do the history, I needed to prepare myself more. I wasn't going to go back and try to be a philosopher, learn to do philosophy; and if I had, I'd have never been able to write that ...


3

The fallacy you're hinting can be characterized broadly as the false cause fallacy. Britannica defines the fallacy as follows: The fallacy of false cause (non causa pro causa) mislocates the cause of one phenomenon in another that is only seemingly related. That being said, the question you ask is quite interesting. While I agree the proposition P: If ...


2

-Is Kuhn's view on the development of science historicist in the Hegelian/Marxist sense, or is it ahistorical? The Kuhnian dynamic is historicist, but it is important to distinguish it from the Hegelian or Marxist dynamics. Kuhn's teleology isn't actually guaranteed, explicitly, by the structure of paradigmatic science-- as long as we try to solve problems, ...


2

The opening is unfair to Kuhn. He characterizes most of science as 'normal science', which is constituted by 'puzzle solving', and is therefore a form of cumulative progress. And it is clear that the candiates in a revolution are only those that already address a majority of the solved puzzles adequately. The result cannot be anything other than ...


2

Kuhns book The Structure of Scientifoc Revolutions (1962) is a work from history of science which touches also philosophical issues. E.g. see the preface of the author. The concept of revolutions is a basic of Kuhn's book. In chapter XI Kuhn draws parallels between scientific and political revolutions. He writes: One aspect of the parallelism must ...


2

"Bachelor are unmarried men" is an analytic proposition given the contemporary meaning of "bachelor" and "married". Words had different meanings at different times but it only follows that the same sentence was expressing a different proposition, not that the proposition that it expresses today is not analytic. Since formal logic is concerned by propositions,...


2

In Ecce Homo, "Why I am so clever", Nietzsche gave his formula for greatness: My formula for human greatness is amor fati: that you do not want anything to be different, not forwards, not backwards, not for all eternity. Not just to tolerate necessity, still less to conceal it – all idealism is hypocrisy towards necessity – but to love it ... [EH ...


2

As @MauroALLEGRANZA has indicated in the comment's Löwy's Fire Alarm is a good resource and probably the only text in English to address the whole of Benjamin's On the Concept of History thesis by thesis. Nevertheless, I thought I might attempt to give some kind of reading of it to address the points you raise. Sorry for the lengthy amount of text. The ...


2

While this is a complex outcome: there are many causes that can work together or be independent in cumulatively making more people adopt Nihilism, there are 3 reasons that spring to mind: Religion is becoming less dominant. With God comes a Philosophy: that of an afterlife, of meaning after death. But as science answers more and more questions, there is ...


2

Ideas are prioritized in the mind by the degree of success achieved during their application (where application also regularly means reproducing the knowledge of parents, teachers, etc.). Where successes are of similar intensity, those earlier in life gain some additional priority compared to those later in life. Given that science has had what could be ...


2

This looks like a translation of the term zeitgeist the spirit of the age) which is usually understood to be taken from Hegel, except that Hegel never used such a term. He did however use the term der Geist seiner zeit, the spirit of his times, in his Lectures on the Philosophy of History. History here should be distinguished from original history which is ...


2

While the Zeitgeist may have been taken to be an objective entity by certain 19th-century and later philosophers, I doubt if Whitehead regarded it as such. In the quote it functions as a metaphor to convey a claim which has some plausibility. (Btw : change 'take is start' to 'takes its start', just a little typo.) I think what Whitehead intends can be ...


2

The thesis-antithesis-synthesis idea is definitely present in Hegel but it was Engels who imposed this formula on the interpretation of Hegel as the major key to his entire philosophy. M. Allegranza is, of course, completely right that Hegel's philosophy operates above the level of everyday life. Hegel's view of history, to which you draw attention is, ...


2

You could, but it only is a "positive" outlook if you make one major assumption: One of the two events has to be positive from your point of view. Hegel only says that to each event a conflicting event will arise, which eventually will lead to a synthesizing event that lies somewhere between the first two events. The conflict between the first two events ...


2

My question is, can we ever know if what we believe is right or wrong? Knowledge doesn't require absolute certainty. When I say, "I know there's a cat on the mat.", then I leave open the possibility of doubting it. What exactly makes knowledge different from belief is of course not an easy question and gets us to a ton of problems in epistemology. Take ...


1

We have discover our real scale in the universe. In the last century we discovered the how big and old the universe is compared with our existence. When the galaxy has billions of stars and there are so much stars in our world. Our lifetime is nothing compared to the 13.8 billion years of the universe. We literally know that the world was existing before us ...


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