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Why do some philosphers including Russell paraphrase this sentence?

Why do some philosopher including Russell paraphrase like this? They think "The king of France is bald" can be paraphrased as "it's the case that the king of France is bald", so ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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1 vote

The relationship between logical systems and natural language semantics

You are asking if there is some sort of methodology applied to natural language that resembles that of the logician, mainly by building an abstract, symbolic system for examining the structure of ...
J D's user avatar
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4 votes

If Large Language Models can do Maths, is Formalism true?

IMO we may consider the link between math and language (maybe more... maybe math is language). Consider a ChatGPT answering our questions. What is it doing? Is it speaking? Or it is only simulating a ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
8 votes

If Large Language Models can do Maths, is Formalism true?

As a constructivist brother who places as much credence in Platonic Forms as he does in the Irish tuatha da dannan or the Norwegian troll, let me dispute the premise that LLMs do math or have much in ...
J D's user avatar
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4 votes

If Large Language Models can do Maths, is Formalism true?

Dougherty[95] is a continuation of an examination of a topic in the theory of large cardinals (those which are critical points of elementary embeddings) that is some many years old, the abstract for ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
0 votes

What does "everything" mean?

"Everything" in the context of 'creation' allows one to well-define God (or any singular diety) rather than the reverse. (def= all things in space plus on earth) things taken as well ...
Wayne L's user avatar
0 votes

What does "everything" mean?

If everything has a creator, who created God? If every painting has a painter, who painted the painter? These are wrong questionings, simply nonsense. No need to think about further. The correct ...
Sehure Yapici's user avatar
4 votes

What does "everything" mean?

To avoid the infinite regress of things determining things it is necessary that the determining ground be not a thing. So what is a thing? In Kantian phenomenology a thing simply exists in the ...
Chris Degnen's user avatar
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5 votes

What does "everything" mean?

I agree completely with your reasoning. Extending the answer due to @MarcoOcram, the deeper question is not a question of linguistics. IMO there is the following dilemma: On one hand, the attempt ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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5 votes

What does "everything" mean?

Sometimes we use the word "everything" with an implicit restriction. As the SEP article on quantification notes in a section on unrestricted quantification: Take a typical use of a ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
2 votes

What does "everything" mean?

In logic, we take special steps to set out the domain of quantification, that is, we are careful to specify what "everything" means. In common speech, people seldom take this step and ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
19 votes
Accepted

What does "everything" mean?

Just extend the painter analogy. There is a set of things that need a painter, and the painter is excluded from that set. Likewise there is a set of things that need an ultimate creator and the ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
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-1 votes

Why do some philosphers including Russell paraphrase this sentence?

In the philosophy of language, there is a notion known as deep structure which originates with Noam Chomsky. It is the idea that when one uses language for others, that one provides a shallow syntax ...
J D's user avatar
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0 votes

Why do some philosphers including Russell paraphrase this sentence?

Note that, "There is an x," can be reordered as, "An x is there," where "there" is an indexical for something like the world/reality/existence (as an atmosphere or ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
0 votes

Can I describe a non-existent object in the past tense?

See Hesiod's Theogony, II, 281: "And when Perseus cut off her [Medusa] head, there sprang forth great Chrysaor and the horse Pegasus who is so called because he was born near the springs (pegae) ...
Mauro ALLEGRANZA's user avatar
4 votes

Why do some philosphers including Russell paraphrase this sentence?

In Fregean terms, a phrase has both a sense and a denotation. For a phrase like "the king of England", the sense is the concept of being king of England, and the denotation is the actual man ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
0 votes

Do the referents of false statements exist?

There needs to be drawn a distinction between contingently false propositions and necessarily false propositions. Contingently false propositions such as “it is sunny in California right now” are ...
PW_246's user avatar
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0 votes

Do the referents of false statements exist?

It is possible to talk about things which do not exist. For example- You can talk about tachyons, they travel with speed greater than speed of light,which do not exist. You can talk about raining of ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar
1 vote

Is a non-existent apple not an apple?

It rather depends on how you choose to use the terminology, particularly the word 'exists'. Also, on whether your preferred approach to ontology includes non-existent things. Since the time of Frege ...
Bumble's user avatar
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8 votes
Accepted

Is a non-existent apple not an apple?

I consider a misuse of language to be the source of confusion: Of course we can form the word “apple” in our mind. It is a concept invented to denote certains objects, like so many other concepts do. ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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3 votes

Is "that nose is fake" nonsense?

As you know, a fake nose is not a nose. I disagree. You seem to conflate the definitions of "nose" and "genuine nose"; which lies at the basis for your claim, but I'd like to ...
Flater's user avatar
  • 1,292
6 votes

Is "that nose is fake" nonsense?

By your argument a "rubber duck" is nonsense too, as is a "prosthetic leg". Avoiding this type of pedantry/sophistry just renders human conversation too tiring to bother. Anything ...
user3445853's user avatar
1 vote

Is "that nose is fake" nonsense?

Would you consider the part of a statue that is in the middle of the face and is meant to look like a nose and contains nostrils to be a 'real' nose, or even a nose at all? What about Frosty's '...
Jason Goemaat's user avatar
4 votes

Is "that nose is fake" nonsense?

Wittgenstein spent a lot of time on this sort of thing. Is the word "cat" a cat. No. Is a photograph of a cat a cat? No. Is a fake nose a nose? No. But the statement "That nose is fake&...
Meanach's user avatar
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11 votes

Is "that nose is fake" nonsense?

"Fake" in "fake nose" typically means the nose is artificial (e.g. man-made and surgically inserted), not that it's not a nose. One might go one step further and say that it ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
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45 votes
Accepted

Is "that nose is fake" nonsense?

You understand what the sentence means; therefore, it is not nonsense. We can perform all sorts of analyses to try to analyse why the sentence is meaningful (e.g. the "nose" refers both to ...
wizzwizz4's user avatar
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-1 votes
Accepted

Can semantics work independently apart from philosophy?

It implies grammar can work independently apart from semantics. This is trivial. All speakers of a language know that it is always possible to speak meaningless but grammatical sentences. This is ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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0 votes

Can semantics work independently apart from philosophy?

The grammar does provide meaning, and is not distinct from it. There are multiple types of semantics. Chomsky's sentence has lexical semantics because you know what each of the words mean. Sentential ...
J D's user avatar
  • 23.1k
0 votes

Can we describe round square, which doesn't exist?

Sometimes propositions are called "truth barers" where their truth or falsity depend on some state of affairs in the world (a particular spatiotemporal location). for e.g. the proposition ...
Richard Bamford's user avatar
0 votes
Accepted

Can we describe round square, which doesn't exist?

Sometimes, some of us have an intuition that statements like, "The round square is round," or, "The round square is square," are "analytically" true. Such statements seem ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
1 vote

Can we describe round square, which doesn't exist?

It is true that there exists no entity which instantiates the set squares which has the characteristic round. It is true that there exists no entity which instantiates the set squares which has the ...
g s's user avatar
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0 votes

Can we describe round square, which doesn't exist?

Square wheels Does this aid you in your quest?
Agent Smith's user avatar
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