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1 vote

Why do humans classify and name things?

Unfortunately, I don't really have a reference for you, but hopefully this will feel intuitive for you: Classification is simply the nature of the human mind. The only way we can logically come to ...
0 votes

Why do humans classify and name things?

Classification and naming are part of the process of abstraction. This wiki artcile could give you an introduction. But please don't let that be the last thing you read on the subject. An important ...
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1 vote

What are the reasons some thoughts cannot be simplified, reduced to a simpler set or phrases?

I'm not sure if I really agree with this statement. Who says those statements can not be simplified further? I think if enough effort is put into it most statements can be simplified, possibly at the ...
1 vote

What are the reasons some thoughts cannot be simplified, reduced to a simpler set or phrases?

For easier thoughts: Short version: Convenience Long Version: I think if you wanted to have a chance at being rigorous (without actually choosing to be rigorous) you could acknowledge that its ...
2 votes

What are the reasons some thoughts cannot be simplified, reduced to a simpler set or phrases?

What do you mean by simplified and simplified to whom? Like for the respective author a text is simple if it gets the meaning across with as little text and explanation as possible. That in turn can ...
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7 votes
Accepted

What are the reasons some thoughts cannot be simplified, reduced to a simpler set or phrases?

Three (or so) thoughts: Philosophers like Heidegger, Hegel or the French post-structuralists introduce a new vocabulary of technical termini. These new words, say "Zuhandenes" ("Ready-...
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5 votes

What are the reasons some thoughts cannot be simplified, reduced to a simpler set or phrases?

I can provide an intuitive answer to this. From a general language, we can create out "sub languages". That is, a smaller language which is capable of consistently dealing with the phenomena ...
0 votes

Do exceptions and deviations from general rules and facts pose a fundamental problem?

So I think if you look at skeptism you'll gain some insight here. In a nutshell, if we follow Cicero, we conclude that, e.g. it is probable that all readers of this sentence are human, and that it is ...
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0 votes

Do exceptions and deviations from general rules and facts pose a fundamental problem?

Depends on your relation to these rules. Like did you assume that they are the end all be all of knowledge concerning that domain? Well yes in that case a single counter example can prove that this is ...
  • 1,364
0 votes
Accepted

What s the difference between extensional and ostensive definition?

You are right that ostensive and extensional definitions both work by pointing out objects fall under the category of the term. However, definition by extension works by listing all the objects in the ...
0 votes

Do exceptions and deviations from general rules and facts pose a fundamental problem?

Newtonian gravity cannot predict some of the movements of the planets as observed from Earth (I forget which), but special relativity can. So yes, I would argue that in fact exceptions do pose a ...
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