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2 votes
Accepted

Reference request for the definition of machines

As I mentioned in comments, the goal of the definition of "machine" is important. In your edit, you state the goal is to determine whether a living thing is a machine or not. This is ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
1 vote

What is an argument (in philosophy)?

An argument is reasoning and a conclusion. Epistemic virtue allows us to identify reasons of an argument, which only goes beyond its premises if it is defeasible. Reasoning is defeasible when the ...
andrós's user avatar
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5 votes

What is an argument (in philosophy)?

Yes, there's an entire field of study called argumentation theory which is essentially the philosophy of arguments. There are different models, in Uses of Argument (GB), Stephen Toulmin lays out a ...
J D's user avatar
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2 votes

What is an argument (in philosophy)?

Without getting technical, you have a argument when a conclusion is said to follow from a set of premises. For a deductive argument, If it in fact follows, the argument is classified as valid. ...
lee pappas's user avatar
-1 votes

Is understanding possible?

"Can humans understand anything?" Yes. If you truly believed it might not be possible to understand anything then there is no point in asking this question, or for anybody to attempt to ...
Michael Hall's user avatar
-1 votes

Can we define a logical constant to be a symbol that has the same meaning in all minds?

Logical constants are called "constants" to reflect the fact that they have the same meaning across all logical expressions. Do they also end up having the same meaning in all minds? They ...
Speakpigeon's user avatar
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0 votes
Accepted

Is understanding possible?

Understanding is illusory and ill-defined. Humans merely feel like they understand. Humans may also feel as if others understand, as an instance of the mind-projection fallacy.
Corbin's user avatar
  • 1,222
1 vote

Neo-liberalism, language and freedom?

Wittgenstein does not address the issue of freedom specifically, but if we turn to his "Philosophical Investigations" it isn't too difficult to suss out where he'd go with it. First off, ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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