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Generally speaking, a classification system is an inclusion system. The ideal is that if we have a stream of objects in front of us, we can sort those objects into appropriate buckets based on the characteristics of the objects themselves. There may, of course, be buckets within buckets, but the buckets are meant to be mutually exclusive. With that in mind, ...


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You've hit on an important philosophical issue. If we define every-thing as a set then 'everything' cannot be a set. Hence fundamental theories must transcend sets and the categories of thought in the manner of Kant or the Perennial philosophy. If we do not do this we cannot have a fundamental theory. The mystics call this place the 'world of opposites' ...


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Beware of conflating individual attributes themselves with objects that can have those attributes. For instance, "happy" and "angry" are two different emotions. Their individual definitions might be mutually exclusive, but that doesn't mean that their existence is mutually exclusive. It is possible for someone to experience both emotions at the same time. ...


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In essence, your question is like this SE post which asks "how science is related to philosophy". Other closely related question are "is science just a more refined and effective method of philosophy?", "how does one know whether a discipline is a science of philosophy?", and "How should we characterize the relationship between mathematics and philosophy of ...


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Let's separate out two aspects of philosophy. First, there is a broad sense in which philosophy is the study of the application of higher reasoning. This goes straight back to the ancient Greek philosophers in the West (and to other ancient thinkers in other regions of the world): to the Socratic method, or Aristotles system of categorization. Note that for ...


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Both discipline use low level logic. But they have a different goal : Science answer the question : How the world ? Philosophy answer the question : Why the world ? So, based on these statements, I think we can't say that maths or physics are a branch of philosophy.


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