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12 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

From the Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948: Article 19: Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; ...
Jo Wehler's user avatar
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11 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

Freedom of speech is already abridged by laws on defamation, copyright infringement, national security, contempt of court etc. So the principle is already established that freedom of speech is not ...
Meanach's user avatar
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10 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

If the term hate speech had been around in the 1930's, you can bet your last dollar that anything supportive or defensive of Jewish people would have received that label under the Nazi regime. The ...
EvilSnack's user avatar
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9 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

No. The question is analogous to freedom of movement. I am entitled to move as I like, but with a very large number of conventional constraints. I cannot use my freedom of movement to break into your ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
6 votes

Why is an open society so totalitarian?

Although I don't normally suggest people read Wikipedia, its Open Society is worth reviewing. In effect, 'openness' in an open society is a position of moral universalism, where a society actively ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

Does the paradox of tolerance mean that intolerance cannot be allowed in a tolerant society?

John Rawls offers this assessment of the problem (A Theory of Justice, 1999 ed., §35): ... it seems that an intolerant sect has no title to complain when it is denied an equal liberty. ... A ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
5 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

Questions about law and policy are questions about compulsion by the threat of violence. The related question about moral permissibility has an obvious answer. You should not say morally wrong things. ...
g s's user avatar
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4 votes

Why is liberalism sometimes portrayed as an enemy to socialism?

Neither 'liberalism' nor 'socialism' has a single, core, essentialist meaning. Liberalism without economics But if we take John Locke or John Stuart Mill as liberal political theorists, proponents ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

How is Rawls's "liberalism" reasonably classified as liberal by this SEP article?

Perhaps the concept of "liberty per se" is not very stable, or is even self-defeating. The freedom-to-lose-freedom, for example, seems (A) wrong to use or (B) wrong to even have. So one ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
3 votes

Why is an open society so totalitarian?

A Frame issue When I was child, my mum was trying to explain the world to me and she said, "There are two Germany-s; the German democratic republic and the Federal republic of Germany. Of these ...
Rushi's user avatar
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3 votes

Do individuals over the world expect a social system to provide "peace and abundance"?

On the Cyrus Cylinder, arguably the first reciprocal commitment between a ruler and their people, Cyrus is portrayed as having been chosen by the chief Babylonian god Marduk to restore peace and order ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
3 votes

Why is an open society so totalitarian?

They don't. You are misusing the term 'pure totalitarianism'. Your question could be re-phrased to ask why liberal societies tend to be intolerant of people with certain views. I consider it to be ...
Marco Ocram's user avatar
3 votes

Why is an open society so totalitarian?

The word "totalitarianism" has a few interrelated meanings, but so it tends to be used to identify regimes that kill large numbers or at least percentages of people in line with the themes ...
Kristian Berry's user avatar
3 votes

Why is an open society so totalitarian?

You are setting out to discuss really important issues. But you do so from a radical, polarized position (as in "in practice it ends up being the exact opposite of what it claims to be"), so ...
Ludwig V's user avatar
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3 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

Never consider the love speech or hate speech as permanent. Freedom of speech is impermanent. Freedom of speech arises , changes and vanishes. Freedom of speech is not absolute in time and space. ...
Dheeraj Verma's user avatar
3 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

When discussing freedom of speech and its limits, scholars and philosophers have offered various perspectives that can provide a framework for understanding the complexities involved. One influential ...
Jordan S's user avatar
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3 votes

Should freedom of speech accept speech against liberal values? Such as hate speech?

“Freedom of speech” should not be a goal. It should be a tool that serves to improve the world. Having the freedom to stand up against injustice is good. Having the freedom to discuss arguments in ...
gnasher729's user avatar
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2 votes

Who Are the Most Prominent Modern Socialist Thinkers?

Modern but not necessarily still living (L): Noam Chomsky (L) Terry Eagleton (L) Bertell Ollman (L) Perry Anderson (L) Chantal Mouffe (L) John E. Roemer (L) Eric Hobsbawm (d. 2012) G.A. Cohen (d. ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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2 votes

Who originally made a coherent argument that government is inevitable because in "anarchy" a government would come about anyway?

I think the closest you'll find to an origin is Jean-Jacques Rousseau and his Social Contract theory. Both Hobbes and Locke thought that anarchy was the natural state of mankind — though granted, ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

How Humanism, the philosophy of the Enlightenment, and classical liberalism are related?

The relationship between classical liberalism and the Enlightenment is easy to identify. John Locke is a paradigm philosopher of the Enlightenment and often identified as the father of English ...
Ludwig V's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Nietzsche and classical liberalism

In general Nietzsche is concerned with foundational values like pity rather than these 'low level' political and especially economic concerns. So there's not always a clear and explicit statement on ...
Wilson Brians 's user avatar
2 votes

Relation of dialectics, as of Hegel and Marx, toward Enlightenment liberalism

In Platonism and Neoplatonism, dialectic assumes an ontological and metaphysical role in that it becomes the process whereby the intellect passes from sensibles to intelligibles, raising from idea to ...
CriglCragl's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Gun control and classical liberalism

**Gun control - just what are we talking about ?' Many of us assume that we must either oppose or support gun control. Not so. We have a range of alternatives. Even this way of speaking ...
Geoffrey Thomas's user avatar
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2 votes

Do individuals over the world expect a social system to provide "peace and abundance"?

Ludwig von Mises believes that "in general, men the world over expect a social system to provide "peace and abundance."[sic] (from "Ludwig von Mises and the Justification of the ...
haxor789's user avatar
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1 vote

Is liberal economics theory materialist?

After having read a bit about materialism, realism and idealism, monism, dualism, ontology and epistemology. I'd say reducing materialism to the rejection of supernaturalism is a little simplistic and ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 6,152
1 vote

Is liberal economics theory materialist?

I'll put my comments to your other Q as kind of an answer here: Is liberal economics materialist? In a broad sense [of the latter] it is. However, a big division in the philosophy of economics is ...
against very long user names's user avatar
1 vote

Justifying the Principle of Equality at Birth: Secular Foundations and Philosophical Perspectives

In "John Locke on Equality, Toleration, and the Atheist Exception" Adalei Broers points out that, Locke describes the state of nature as one “of equality, wherein all the power and ...
Brian Z's user avatar
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1 vote

Why is an open society so totalitarian?

Your question deserves a reasonable response, so I won't vote to close. Your question is a bit of a screed, however, it's important to respond to what is a misconception. An open society is not a ...
J D's user avatar
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